Blog

Though many are not thrilled about the April 15th deadline, death is an even more inevitable part of life than taxes. Sometimes we try to lessen the impact of death through our words:  bit the dust, bought the farm, kicked the bucket, flat-lined, passed on, checked out, gave up the ghost, met his maker, paid […]

Find jobs at Careers by KevinMD.com. Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now. Learn more.


Read more ...

One of the most popular topics in health care is the idea of universal health care coverage. You know the soundbites: “Medicare for all.” “Single-payer system.” While universal coverage sounds desirable to many, some factors must be considered. In this post, I’m going to provide an aerial view of this complicated topic. My goal is […]

Find jobs at Careers by KevinMD.com. Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now. Learn more.


Read more ...

My husband, who’s had type 2 diabetes for 20 years, had been struggling for a long while to lower his hemoglobin A1C — a number that measures how well he’s managing his blood sugar over time. When he and I finally investigated the issue, it turned out that someone close to him was thwarting his […]

Find jobs at Careers by KevinMD.com. Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now. Learn more.


Read more ...

Practicing medicine at the frontlines is hard. It’s damn hard. Every minute you need to be alert, ready to respond to a potential life or death situation, and be called to another important problem. The current medical practice environment — with excessive bureaucracy, suboptimal information technology, and extreme time pressure with patients — adds exponentially […]

Find jobs at Careers by KevinMD.com. Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now. Learn more.


Read more ...

Back when I was a third-year medical student, I would sometimes bike to the hospital campus early enough to catch the groundskeepers cleaning the promenade in front of the medical school before the foot traffic arrived. Discovery Walk, as it’s called, is a beautiful promenade with stone murals commemorating the significant discoveries made at Stanford. […]

Find jobs at Careers by KevinMD.com. Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now. Learn more.


Read more ...

A excerpt from From Reading to Healing: Teaching Medical Professionalism through Literature (Literature and Medicine). There are several traditional ways to teach about professionalism. Some training programs have didactic lectures on this issue. These typically focus on principle-based ethics and “rules” about professionalism. “Do this. Don’t do that.” Most educators and students will agree that lecturing […]

Find jobs at Careers by KevinMD.com. Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now. Learn more.


Read more ...

The Observer journalist on her father’s dementia, caring for campaigners, and facing her fears in her new book

• Read an extract from What Dementia Teaches Us About Love

Nicci Gerrard is a journalist and campaigner, who writes bestselling novels with her husband under the name Nicci French. She won the 2016 Orwell prize for her reporting on the care of dementia patients in the UK.

What compelled you to write this book?
I didn’t want to write a memoir about my father [John Gerrard, who died in 2014 after 10 years with dementia], partly because there have been lots of wonderful memoirs about dementia and I saw no reason to add another, and partly because he was a private man and I didn’t want to invade his privacy more than necessary. But I did need to write a book about dementia, having witnessed what he went through, and then launching John’s Campaign with my friend Julia Jones. I found myself thinking more and more about what it’s like to live with dementia, and also what dementia teaches us about our sense of self, how we value people, and what it is to be vulnerable. It profoundly shook up the way that I thought about all of those things.

Continue...

Read more ...

As a medical student, I can get support when I need it. That isn’t the case for junior doctors struggling with mental health

I was four months into my clinical training as a medical student when I first encountered a suicide.

It wasn’t a patient.

Related: By the end of my first year as a doctor, I was ready to kill myself

The British Medical Association offers free, confidential support to doctors and medical students on 0330 123 1245. In the UK, Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is 13 11 14. Other international suicide helplines can be found at www.befrienders.org.

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Calls not to politicise mental-health issues fall flat when an era of cuts and uncertainty sees our mental wellbeing plummet

There was something about the events in Westminster this week that made me think of the news that sales of self-help books in Britain are at a record high. As we encounter an ever more stressful and unsteady climate, we are turning to those who offer answers (an issue not least for those who can’t afford the price of a book). Some of this anxiety must come down to more global patterns – climate change, say, or the fragility of democratic norms – but much can come down to the more prosaic matters of life: ability to pay the bills, job prospects, or simply the sense that we have a grasp on the future.

Just look at Brexit. More than four in 10 people say that Brexit has impacted on their mental health in the past two years; hardly surprising considering 44% of respondents to the YouGov survey believed EU withdrawal will worsen their lives. Some EU nationals living in the UK have even reported feeling suicidal as uncertainty about their future steps up.

Related: Mental health patients have been thrown down the Brexit rabbit-hole | Zoe Williams

Last week’s...

Read more ...

Study says 30% of first-time psychotic disorders in south London linked to strong drugs

Frequent cannabis use and high-strength varieties are likely to increase the chance of mental health problems among users, according to researchers behind the largest study of its kind.

Experts have previously flagged a link between cannabis use and psychosis, particularly among vulnerable people with heavy use of the drug. Now research suggests the potency of the cannabis is also important, with patterns in cannabis use linked to how often new cases of psychotic disorders arise in different cities.

Related: Does marijuana use really cause psychotic disorders? | Carl L Hart and Charles Ksir

Related: How dangerous is marijuana for young men's mental health?

Related: Cannabis smoking in teenage years linked to adulthood depression

Continue reading...

Read more ...

The way this industry operates is toxic. Shows such as Love Island have to take better care of contestants

Those of us who are grieving the loss of our mate Mike Thalassitis, who died on Saturday, remain shocked at his death. However, even now, you won’t need to look very far on social media to identify attacks and trolling that are the norm for people who have been on reality TV shows. One thing’s for sure, when the producers of Love Island sold us “the dream”, they never warned us about the reality we could face.

“They know what they’re getting into”, people say. If only that were true, how differently things might have turned out. I’m trying to get to grips with what’s just happened. A 26-year-old guy. My friend. He couldn’t go on. This isn’t a show. This is the real thing.

Related: Love Island: Matt Hancock says reality shows must support mental health

Related: Don’t scoff at Love Island. It’s British society laid bare | Leah Green

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Facebook et al have 3 billion users. We should be focusing on living with it, rather then abandoning, restricting or censoring it

Is social media addictive? The issue is complex, and probably generational.

It’s obvious that what social media does to us, especially those of us who are heavy users, is not natural, or normal. It’s not normal to submit opinions for approval every day to an online crowd, nor is it normal to consume the opinions of strangers in bulk. It’s not normal to live under the surveillance of software companies, which tailor their advertising with such eerie precision that it seems impossible that they are not listening in on our conversations. It’s definitely not normal to wake in the night to use social media, or to spend roughly 24 hours a week on it, returning again and again even though it can make us feel depressed and alone. None of these behaviours were normal a few decades ago, nor are they especially useful to us today, but they’re practised by billions of people across the world.

Related: Social media addiction should be seen as a disease, MPs say

Related: Social media copies gambling methods 'to create psychological cravings'

Continue...

Read more ...

On this week’s show, Claire and Sian meet up at London book fair to discuss the trends and biggest books announced for 2019 and 2020. Then they sit down with neuropsychologist AK Benjamin and novelist Anthony Good, who have written two very different books turning the tables on therapy. Benjamin’s genre-busting take on mental health, Let Me Not Be Mad, puts the author centre stage, while Good’s Kill [redacted] is a thriller in which a man grieving the murder of his wife attempts to justify his right to revenge through letters to his therapist.

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Cambridge researchers grew ‘organoid’ that spontaneously connected to spinal cord

Scientists have grown a miniature brain in a dish with a spinal cord and muscles attached, an advance that promises to accelerate the study of conditions such as motor neurone disease.

The lentil-sized grey blob of human brain cells were seen to spontaneously send out tendril-like connections to link up with the spinal cord and muscle tissue, which was taken from a mouse. The muscles were then seen to visibly contract under the control of the so-called brain organoid.

Related: Meet the neuroscientist shattering the myth of the gendered brain

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Health secretary says he was moved by death of Mike Thalassitis

Matt Hancock has said reality-TV shows have a duty of care for contestants when they become famous. The health secretary’s comments follow the death of the former Love Island contestant Mike Thalassitis.

Psychologists speaking to the Guardian also stressed the importance of support both before and after stars appeared on these programmes, saying people often found it “hard to handle” when they were thrown into the public eye.

Continue reading...

Read more ...

‘What we stick in our mouths matters to our mental health,’ says a leading light in this new field. So what should we be eating?

Felice Jacka’s work showing that junk food shrinks the brain was motivated by personal experience. Growing up in Melbourne, Australia, Jacka struggled with anxiety and panic disorders; by the time she enrolled at art school, she was accustomed to regular bouts of depression, too, leaving her “devoid of happy feelings and unable to experience pleasure”.

But in her late 20s Jacka managed to recover and stay well by focusing on her diet, exercise and sleep. The effect was so marked that it inspired her to put her life as an artist on hold in order to dedicate herself to studying the effects of diet on mental health.

Continue reading...

Read more ...

UK report suggests sites such as Facebook and Instagram could be harming mental health

Social media addiction should be considered a disease, MPs have said, in a sign of the pressures facing technology companies and the growing concern over the impact social networks are having on users’ mental health.

The politicians called for further research on the effects of social media but said a report suggested there was good reason to believe sites such as Facebook, Instagram and Twitter – which are constantly competing for users to spend more time on their platforms – could be having a corrosive effect on children.

Related: Bedtime social media use may be harming UK teenagers, study says

Continue reading...

Read more ...

The genre is often blamed for glamourising violence and misogyny but a new study reveals that rappers are prioritising mental health and social angst in their lyrics

Rap is often blamed for glamorising gang culture but a study analysing lyrics from America’s Billboard 100 chart shows that it is actually providing a vivid commentary on social angst, malaise and mental health.

The data – amassed from lyrics in songs featured in the end-of-year charts from 1958 to 2017, using a computer program called TextBlob – reveals that the most popular music genre in the US may also be its most depressed. A rise in rappers discussing mental health has led to a significant spike in the number of tracks mentioning suicide, depression, anxiety and prescription drugs .

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Randolph Nesse’s insightful book suggests that conditions such as anxiety and depression have a clear evolutionary purpose

Randolph Nesse is a pioneer in what he argues is a new way of thinking about psychiatric disorders and the science of mind. He sees his work as a branch of Darwinism. This intriguing book turns some age-old questions about the human condition upside down: “Why,” Nesse wonders at the outset, “do mental disorders exist at all? Why are there so many? Why are they so common?” Surely, he suggests, “natural selection could have eliminated anxiety, depression, addiction, anorexia and the genes that cause autism, schizophrenia and manic depressive illness. But it didn’t. Why not?”

Nesse, formerly both a professor of psychology and psychiatry and now the director of the Center for Evolution and Medicine at Arizona State University was never, of course, going to offer definitive answers to these questions. Rather, in an engaging, storytelling voice that rests on 30 years of clinical practice, he offers a series of insights, both scientific and anecdotal, that begins to show why the vulnerabilities in our psyche are fundamental to the survival of our genes. Nesse is...

Read more ...

The comedian is neurotic, searingly honest and very funny. But has he finally learned to love himself? He talks to Eva Wiseman about his new film, tricky fathers and being a big cat

Simon Amstell was in a car on the way to the premiere of his first feature film, and he was feeling anxious. This wasn’t surprising. Anybody might be expected to be nervous screening the first film they’d written and directed, a semi-autobiographical love story about intimacy. But those who have followed Amstell’s career, whether making musicians sweat on Popworld or the stand-up shows where he unpicks his mental health for laughs, might expect another level of anxiety, a kind of high-pitched hum of anxiety from the back seat.

This is a man who lives in a vacuum of discomfort (at an orgy in LA, having cautiously touched a bottom, “so hard it was like a cupboard,” he found himself frustrated by the casual sex and nudity, and really wishing someone was wearing a hat). Now 39, Amstell has always insisted on revealing the truth, however excruciating that may be. His film, titled Benjamin, tells the story of a man, not unlike Amstell, who is premiering his own feature; the first scene they shot was Mark...

Read more ...

In an extract from her new book, the Observer journalist remembers her father’s dementia and death, and reflects on the disease’s impact on society

• Read an interview with Nicci Gerrard

The year before my father died, he came with us to Sweden for the summer. He had been living with his dementia for more than 10 years by then, and – mildly, sweetly, uncomplainingly – he was gradually disappearing, memories falling away, words going, recognition fading, in the great unravelling. But he was very happy on that holiday. He was a man who had a deep love for the natural world and felt at home in it; he knew the names of English birds and insects, wildflowers and trees. When I was a child, I remember him taking me to listen to the dawn chorus in the woods near our house. Standing under the canopy of trees in the bright wash of sound, he would tell me which song was the mistle thrush and which the blackbird. At least, I think I remember this, but perhaps I make it up as a story to tell myself when I’m sad.

In Sweden, he picked wild mushrooms in the forest, went to a joyful crayfish party where he drank aquavit and wore a garland in his white hair, sat with a palette of watercolours...

Read more ...

In my first year of medical school, I attended a lecture on health disparities that focused on the difference in patient outcomes based on race and socioeconomic status. The lecture cited multiple peer-reviewed studies that extensively demonstrated these disparities and how health care professionals, not solely social determinants of health, contribute to them. The lecture […]

Find jobs at Careers by KevinMD.com. Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now. Learn more.


Read more ...

I was in the hospital when I heard the word “apple.”  Without hesitating, I reached into my pocket to see if I had my phone.  But the person speaking was referring to the fruit, not the product.  This got me thinking: “Has technology and our products now become more important than our health?” Technology surrounds […]

Find jobs at Careers by KevinMD.com. Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now. Learn more.


Read more ...

Let’s talk about that infamous transition to third year. This is a precarious time in your medical school career when your resolve faces its greatest challenge yet. After weeks of self-imposed exile to prepare for Step 1, you finally take that dreaded exam. Before you even know whether or not you’ve passed, you and your […]

Find jobs at Careers by KevinMD.com. Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now. Learn more.


Read more ...

At some point in my career, I had the crazy idea that if I could scale the patient-centric work I was doing in my community at a small rural hospital — then I could make more of an impact. This is why, when a technology company came calling, dangling a carrot in front of my […]

Find jobs at Careers by KevinMD.com. Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now. Learn more.


Read more ...

Since the passing of the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act in 2009, it has been said that health tech would dramatically revolutionize health care and the patient experience. Advocates have claimed time and time again that it would advance disease diagnosis capabilities, improve patient outcomes, and increase patient satisfaction. Belief […]

Find jobs at Careers by KevinMD.com. Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now. Learn more.


Read more ...

When I was a third-year medical student in 2006, I was assigned to spend the day at a well-known women’s health clinic in Toronto. I walked into the procedure room and introduced myself to the attending. His first words to me were: “Are you married?” I replied that I wasn’t married, and he (while continuing […]

Find jobs at Careers by KevinMD.com. Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now. Learn more.


Read more ...

Blythe Danner plays a woman with dementia whose husband and children must decide whether it’s time for her to move into a care home

A tissue remained resolutely wedged up my sleeve for the duration of this well-acted, scrupulously polite American indie about a family coping with Alzheimer’s, which has met with ecstatic reviews, but left me a little cold. What We Had is the writing-directing debut of actor Elizabeth Chomko, with Hilary Swank and Michael Shannon as siblings trying to persuade their dad that after a long, happy marriage it’s time for their mum to be moved into care home – or “memory centre” as the glossy brochure grimly puts it.

Swank is chef Bridget, who flies home to Chicago when her mother Ruth (Blythe Danner), who has dementia, is found wandering in the middle of night halfway across town during a snowstorm. Bridget’s brother, Nick (Shannon), thinks it’s time for professional care. Their dad, Burt (Robert Forster), flat out refuses to live apart from his wife. Who can feed and bathe her, tend to her memories better than he can? The intimacy between Burt and Ruth is gently moving: this old-school macho guy putting on marigolds to bleach his wife’s roots.

Continue...

Read more ...

Vinny has been violent, Leanne hears voices, and Harry is paranoid. How does the vogue for wellbeing help them?

Mental health is everywhere. The phrase reverberates from nurseries to nursing homes, and hushed conversations once held out of the earshot of children and polite company are giving way to a more open dialogue about psychological wellbeing. But are we seeing the full picture? And does the vogue for wellbeing distract us from a long-overdue conversation about individuals with serious mental illness?

I work as a consultant psychiatrist in assertive outreach, a specialty that aims to help those who have struggled to engage with psychiatric services. While they too have mental health problems, you don’t hear a lot about some of the people I meet.

Related: 'It's nothing like a broken leg': why I'm done with the mental health conversation

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Diabulimia, which can be fatal, occurs if type 1 diabetics stop taking insulin to lose weight

Diabetics who also have a rare and potentially fatal eating disorder are to start receiving specialist NHS help to reduce their risk of suffering its “devastating” consequences.

About 55,000 people in England with type 1 diabetes also have diabulimia, which occurs when a person with the condition stops taking insulin regularly because they want to lose weight.

Continue reading...

Read more ...

The author of a novel to help young people deal with anorexia says his message is a hopeful one - most people recover

When an eating disorder took hold of Samuel Pollen at the age of 12 he felt as if the bad cop within him was taking over. He says anorexia is like having a severe voice in your head that grows to be all-consuming, but is also separate from who you really are.

Now, aged 30, he is able to talk openly about his childhood experience. To help others he has written a book, The Year I Didn’t Eat, which chronicles 12 months in the life of fictional 14-year-old Max as he struggles with anorexia.

Related: Genetic study of eating disorders could pave way for new treatment

Related: As a teenage boy with anorexia I couldn't find words to describe my mental illness

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Largest-ever mental health poll of universities ‘an urgent call to action’, say researchers

A poll of almost 38,000 UK students suggests rates of psychological distress and illness are on the rise in universities, with “alarmingly high” levels of anxiety, loneliness, substance misuse and thoughts of self-harm.

Researchers say the report, seen exclusively by the Guardian, is the largest mental health survey ever conducted among UK university students, and its findings constitute “an urgent call to action”.

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Bad debt and mental health problems can be a vicious circle. Only by forcing banks to provide more help can this be addressed

Money management is not easy at the best of times. Choosing the right deal, setting up standing orders, checking you’re not over or underpaying, switching providers – the whole thing can be overwhelming. This is doubly true for those with mental health problems – and a new report from Citizens Advice has exposed just how difficult it can be. It found that when poor mental health reduces someone’s ability to carry out daily activities, it can end up costing them £1,110 to £1,550 a year.

The reasons for this are manifold. Choosing services can be problematic – difficulty acting under pressure, poor working memory and poor response inhibition can prevent people from getting the right deal. Paying for services can be impacted by difficulties doing paperwork, and dealing with problems can be hindered by avoidance or a reluctance to communicate. This may not be the case for everyone – mental illness can manifest in any variety of ways. But inaccessible services and inadequate support are problems across the board, no matter the exact nature of someone’s...

Read more ...

Administrators are arriving at a better understanding of the extent of anxiety and depression among top sportspeople and a finger is pointing at social media

On Friday night the NBA’s commissioner, Adam Silver, made a statement that was both shocking and profound: many of the league’s players, who have an average salary of $7m a year, were “truly unhappy”. He told the MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference: “The outside world sees the fame, the money, all the trappings that go with it, and they say: ‘How is it possible they even can be complaining?’ But a lot of these young men are genuinely unhappy.”

As he warmed to the theme of his players’ mental health, Silver told his audience that the NBA All-Star Isaiah Thomas once told him that “championships are won on the bus” with the players having greater camaraderie – and fewer headphones – but times have changed. Indeed one superstar had recently told Silver that from getting off a plane to a game to showing up in the arena he sometimes did not see a single person.

Related: Victoria Pendleton’s candour highlights again the vulnerability of ex-champions

Related: From drugs and alcohol to wellbeing: how rugby league is tackling...

Read more ...

More than 13% of people are susceptible to panic attacks, which can be very intense and distressing. So what are the symptoms and how best can you respond?

According to the Mental Health Foundation (MHF), 13.2% of people have experienced a panic attack. If you know someone who suffers from them frequently, it can be helpful to better understand what they are. Attacks can last between five and 30 minutes, with symptoms including rapid breathing, sweating, a racing heart, shivering and feeling sick. The NHS, MHF, the mental health charities Mind, Time to Change and No Panic have resources available.

Continue reading...

Read more ...

As little as 10 minutes of regular exercise can help alleviate depression. But even professionals don’t always make the link between mental and physical health. One convert explains how it helped her

I once lived a life almost ruled by anxiety, intrusive thoughts and paralysing fear. I spent years looking for the thing that would release me, and when I finally found it, it wasn’t medication or therapy (although both helped). It was running. It gave me a feeling that there was a world out there beckoning me, promising hope; it gave me independence and the sense that I had reserves of strength that I wasn’t aware of.

There are many reasons that physical activity is said to help mental health – it boosts mood, relieves stress and improves sleep. I also find that cardio exercise can use up some of the adrenaline caused by anxiety. My panic attacks stopped, intrusive thoughts lessened and a looming sense of doom was pushed back.

Continue reading...

Read more ...

App hosts dozens of group chats where youngsters are given strict weight-loss advice

Thousands of young people with eating disorders are being preyed on by “anorexia coaches” operating on an anonymous messaging app, a Guardian investigation can reveal.

Kik, a popular app among children and teenagers that has previously come under fire over safeguarding issues, hosts dozen of pro-anorexia group chats that are open to the public.

Related: Hospital admissions for eating disorders surge to highest in eight years

Related: Samuel Pollen: 'Having an eating disorder is like having a bad cop inside your head'

In the UK, Beat can be contacted on 0808 8010677 or emailed at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (over-18s), This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (students) or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. (under-18s). In the US, the National Eating Disorders Association helpline number is 1800 9312237. In Australia, the Butterfly Foundation for Eating Disorders helpline number is 1800 334673.

Continue reading...

Read more ...

After 30 years, a New Hampshire man’s case could change practice of transferring non-criminal psychiatric patients to prison

Douglas Butler was confused. He thought his son, Andrew Butler, had been transferred to another, more secure psychiatric hospital. But when he drove to the address of the secure psychiatric unit on the outskirts of New Hampshire’s capital of Concord, he couldn’t see anything that resembled a hospital.

Instead, he saw the coils of razor wire and imposing walls of the New Hampshire state prison for men.

The treatment he has received is cruel and unusual punishment without having been convicted of a crime.

You could find yourself stuck there for months or years longer than anybody thinks you need to be there.

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Families desperately need joined-up support, but ministers refuse to see how their policies set up poor children to fail

Children in England are facing their own hostile environment, with government policy undermining their right to a fair start in life and support for families systematically dismantled since 2010.

First 1,000 days of life, published this week by the Commons health and social care committee, exposes the extent of the damage – and the impact it has had.

Related: Poverty and ill health: the ugly bedfellows blighting millions | Richard Vize

Related: Welcome to the UK in 2018, where babies are dying because of the cuts | Richard Vize

Related: Sign up for Society Weekly: our newsletter for public service professionals

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Concrete tower blocks have become the bogeymen for all manner of ills – but what’s really behind it?

  • Hard living: what does concrete do to our bodies?

Sous les pavés, la plage!” exclaimed Parisian protesters in May 1968: “Under the paving stones, the beach!”

Cities, they believed, were drowning in concrete, suppressing the hedonistic spirit and revolutionary potential of the people who lived in them. Fifty years later, the inner-city borough of Hackney in east London is employing its own “postcode gardener”, Kate Poland, to encourage local residents to dig up concrete and stone and replace them with trees, climbing plants and flowers.

This week Guardian Cities investigates the shocking impact of concrete on the planet, to learn what we can do to bring about a less grey world.

Related: 'Concrete? It's communist': the rise and fall of the utopian socialist material

Continue reading...

Read more ...

I could hear the scream from across the room. It was shrill and filled with panic. Any parent can identify the difference between the cries of normal toddler discomforts and a true emergency. I dropped what I was doing in the kitchen and found my three year old lying motionless on the ground, unable to […]

Find jobs at Careers by KevinMD.com. Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now. Learn more.


Read more ...

Diagnostic errors (missed, delayed, incorrect diagnoses) are increasingly being recognized as a prevalent cause of harm to patients. At the same time, physicians are simultaneously under pressure to deliver high-quality, low-cost health care. How do physicians come to a balance between the competing demands of addressing underuse versus overuse, and consequently a balance between underdiagnosis […]

Find jobs at Careers by KevinMD.com. Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now. Learn more.


Read more ...

Mental health issues in teenagers could be minimised by age controls and regulation over the strength of the product

New research was published this week highlighting the associations between teenage cannabis use and a range of mental health problems. The results suggested that use of the drug was associated with an increased risk of depression and a significantly higher risk of suicide attempts.

As usual in a study based on survey data, the authors noted that a clear line of causation from cannabis use to the reported effects cannot be drawn. There are always other potential mechanisms in action. Young people who use cannabis regularly may already be experiencing mental health issues that make drug use more likely; or be facing adverse life experiences that influence both their mental health and drug consumption.

Related: How dangerous is marijuana for young men's mental health?

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Toronto researchers believe the drug can also help those with depression, schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s

An experimental drug that bolsters ailing brain cells has raised hopes of a treatment for memory loss, poor decision making and other mental impairments that often strike in old age.

The drug could be taken as a daily pill by over-55s if clinical trials, which are expected to start within two years, show that the medicine is safe and effective at preventing memory lapses.

Related: How to avoid losing your memory in the digital age

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Study finds one in 14 cases in under-35s could be avoided if teenagers did not use the drug

Scientists believe they have identified about 60,000 cases of depression in adults under 35 in the UK, and more than 400,000 in the US, that could be avoided if adolescents did not smoke cannabis.

An international team of scientists looked at 11 studies published from the mid-1990s onwards, involving a total of more than 23,000 people, they report in the journal JAMA Psychiatry. They explored the use of cannabis for non-medicinal purposes in under-18s. Participants were then followed into adulthood to see who developed clinical depression, anxiety or suicidal behaviour. No single study looked at all three mental health issues.

Related: Quitting cannabis could lead to better memory and cognition

Related: How dangerous is marijuana for young men's mental health?

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Call for more government funding as survey finds 80% of officers felt stress in past year

Police officers have reported being driven to breaking point by the dual pressures of staffing cuts and rising demands, with a survey finding eight out of 10 had felt stressed in the past year.

The survey by the Police Federation, which covers England and Wales, is part of a campaign to pressure the government to fund more officers on the beat after years of cuts.

Continue reading...

Read more ...

With conventional services overstretched, teenagers in the Cumbria coastal town of Maryport teamed up to assist their peers

Last year, Molly Robinson, 15, was struggling to cope with the symptoms caused by an undiagnosed health condition. The unexplained pain, plus the worry about what was wrong, caused her to feel increasingly anxious and distressed. She plucked up the courage to seek help. And what happened? “I was put on a waiting list.”

Over the next three months things just got worse until she began to feel “completely overwhelmed”. “Everything snowballed,” says Molly. At crisis point, she couldn’t cope with going to school. “It took that for anyone to take things seriously,” she adds.

Related: UK pupils to join global strike over climate change crisis

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Just 6.3% of people referred for NHS psychological help are older than 65, shows study

GPs are giving too many older people antidepressants when they are struggling with depression, and should prescribe talking therapies far more often, according to new research.

Family doctors too often avoid talking to patients over the age of 65 about depression and do not have the time to explore and treat the condition properly, the study found.

Related: Antidepressants work – but we need to talk, too | Rhik Samadder

Related: Is everything you think you know about depression wrong?

In the UK, Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. You can contact the mental health charity Mind by calling 0300 123 3393 or visiting mind.org.uk. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is on 13 11 14. Other international suicide helplines can be found at www.befrienders.org.

Continue reading...

Read more ...

About this site

Mental health is a level of psychological well-being, or an absence of a mental disorder; it is the "psychological state of someone who is functioning at a satisfactory level of emotional and behavioral adjustment".

Feed Display

#1 Mental Health Blog – Talkspace

26 March 2019