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When I was a young child, like most children, I loved Disney. However, my fascination with Disney did not involve the exhilarating theme parks, characters or delicious foods. As a young boy, I was captivated by the Disney culture, the multifaceted business model and the life and legacy of Walt Disney. During the past two […]

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Health care safety efforts have long focused on improving the behavior of providers and improving the systems of care. A proven model of safety is in the airline industry. There are undoubtedly many parallels between airline safety and health care working toward common goals. This work should continue in both industries to ensure the safety […]

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I was recently seeing a rather complicated medical patient in the hospital. We were treating both a heart and kidney condition, and things were not going so well. To spare anyone non-medical who is reading this the scientific details of the bodily processes involved, we were essentially balancing hydrating, with the need to get rid […]

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Does anyone in medicine, particularly emergency medicine, understand why we lose money? Why we have to push those metrics so hard to capture every dime? I mean, we’re constantly reminded that satisfaction scores, and time-stamps and time to door, time to needle, time to discharge, reduced “left without being seen” scores are connected to the […]

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The oncologist had prescribed Xgeva hoping it would strengthen her bones while also delaying the progression of Angela Kahn’s breast cancer. But Kahn (a pseudonym) couldn’t get over the price of the drug. Before the oncologist had a chance to ask how she was feeling, she blurted out that the medication cost “$15,000 a shot.” […]

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The NHS is at last recognising that men have postnatal issues too, and that the health of family members is intertwined

The news that partners of those new and expectant mothers who suffer from depression or anxiety will be offered mental health checks by the NHS is extremely welcome. It is good for men, but also a breakthrough for women. That’s because the NHS is at last recognising not only that men have postnatal issues too, but that the wellbeing of new mothers is deeply dependent on supporting the skills and capacities of their children’s fathers.

This change will help to avoid the potentially tragic cases we hear about at the Fatherhood Institute, a UK charity. With support from the NHS, new fathers will be better able to deal with mental health issues they may have, and to help their partners through psychosis, anxiety and depression after they give birth.

Related: NHS to introduce mental health checks for new fathers

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New data from Médecins Sans Frontières shows extremely high rates of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts on the island

The island nation of Nauru is in the grips of a mental health crisis, according to new data from Médecins Sans Frontières, revealing that its Nauruan and refugee patients showed similar levels of mental illness far worse than other MSF projects around the world.

It found stigma and a lack of understanding of mental illness was leading to poor healthcare for both cohorts, but that Nauruan patients were improving under MSF treatment while refugees and asylum seekers did not.

Related: Group of Manus Island refugees move to Nauru amid worsening health crisis

Related: Many families remain separated amid ongoing Nauru medical transfers

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Health service in England to offer help for men whose partners experience health problems

New fathers and fathers-to-be will be offered mental health checks if their partner is suffering anxiety, psychosis or postnatal depression, NHS England has announced.

While it is well recognised that pregnant women and and new mothers can experience mental health problems, little attention has been paid to their partners.

Related: NHS hospitals treat soaring number of older people for drug misuse

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Screenwriter hopes new BBC production, called Care, will spark debate on growing social problem

The screenwriter Jimmy McGovern has called for a national conversation on attitudes towards care of the elderly and infirm, saying politicians needed to stop “dodging” the issue and that more television dramas should tackle such social problems.

McGovern, the writer behind award-winning programmes such as Cracker, Hillsborough and last year’s drama Broken, has made Care, a 90-minute production for the BBC. It tells the story of a single mother who has to care for her elderly mother after she has a stroke and develops dementia, and how the local health authorities refuse to take responsibility.

Related: Complaints over social care in England nearly trebled since 2010

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The three leading regulatory bodies for the counselling and psychotherapy profession have created a new competence framework as a response to the mental health crisis

Suzanne Moore is right (We can talk about self-care, but this mental health crisis is political, 26 November) that counselling and psychotherapy is about talking and that “it is better to talk about things rather than not”. Addressing the mental health crisis is one of the most challenging tasks faced by us all and counselling and psychotherapy have an important role to play in providing a solution. As the three leading regulatory bodies for the counselling and psychotherapy profession, representing over 50,000 counsellors and psychotherapists, we take this role very seriously. We have registers accredited by the Professional Standards Authority, accountable to parliament, and have in place robust professional training and conduct procedures.

To ensure that we continue to offer consistent training requirements and practice standards across the three professional bodies, we are mapping and defining common professional competencies for our professions. The Scope of Practice and Education for the counselling and...

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Prize recognises contribution to the understanding of mental health problems

  • Hannah’s award-winning article: It’s Nothing Like a Broken Leg

The Guardian writer Hannah Jane Parkinson has been named journalist of the year at the Mind media awards 2018.

The prize, which recognises an outstanding contribution to the understanding of mental health problems, was awarded to Parkinson for her article It’s Nothing Like a Broken Leg, published in June.

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Legal practitioners and charities help parents find solutions, but are hampered by the current system, write a range of professionals in the field

The government’s consultation process on how to reform the divorce system ends on 10 December. It is imperative that the best interests of children are kept at the heart of any decision. A new YouGov poll commissioned by Resolution shows 79% of the population believe conflict from divorce or separation can negatively affect children’s mental health, with this number rising to 87% among those who experienced their own parents’ or step-parents’ divorce during childhood. At an emotionally traumatic time such as divorce or separation, parents want and need support in order to put the best interests of their children first. Legal practitioners and charities help parents find solutions, but are hampered by the current fault-based divorce system. Apportioning blame can cause unnecessary acrimony – it is this conflict which can often have a significant negative impact on children.

Seventy-one per cent of the population side with professionals and politicians, agreeing that no fault divorce is urgently needed to protect the long-term interests...

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Overstretched officers are having to act as a last line of defence Is it time to say enough is enough?

Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services (HMICFRS) tells us that “overstretched police forces are having to ‘pick up the pieces of a broken mental health system’ on top of tackling crime”.

As an experienced police officer, for me the standout words in that sentence are “having to”. The police are never closed, can’t knock off early and are always the last line of defence. We can never say “no”. This seems a far cry from the partnership working ethos of the noughties, when there was so much overlap between services that people were far better supported. In these austere times, services continue to “shrink apart”, and vulnerable people are falling through the gaps.

Related: Police 'picking up pieces of mental health system', says watchdog

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Health secretary faces growing calls to intervene as trust is rated inadequate for third time

The health secretary, Matt Hancock, is facing mounting calls to intervene in England’s worst performing mental health trust after it was rated inadequate for a third time.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) found “significant concerns” when it inspected Norfolk and Suffolk NHS foundation trust in September including patients harming themselves and taking overdoses while waiting to be seen.

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Review suggests raft of improved rights for people detained under the Mental Health Act

People with serious mental health problems should be given a host of new rights to ensure they receive better care if they are detained for compulsory treatment, an inquiry ordered by Theresa May has found.

The 50,000 people a year who are sectioned under the Mental Health Act should be able to set out how they want to be looked after and challenge doctors’ decisions about them, said the year-long independent review, led by Prof Sir Simon Wessely, an ex-president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists.

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The heavyweight boxer who used to pray for death has shown that depression and addiction don’t have to be for ever

As a psychiatrist whose job is to preserve healthy minds, it feels a little unusual to be championing a mental health advocate who punches people in the head for a job. But that’s where I find myself with Tyson Fury.

On Sunday, having set my alarm for silly o’clock in the morning, I got up, boiled the kettle and sat down to watch two grown men try to knock each other into states of unconsciousness; the kind I’d always been taught to avoid at medical school. I’m not really a fan of boxing. Besides the risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy induced by a head injury (“punch-drunk syndrome”), I’ve never understood how bloody violence is permissible in society so long as it’s within a ring?

Related: US fans don’t always take British boxing seriously – Fury showed they should | Richard Williams

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A new report concludes that socioeconomic factors are seriously jeopardising the future health of 16 to 24-year-olds

Young people’s health and wellbeing is being eroded by a lack of jobs, a shortage of housing and cuts to public services. A new report by the Health Foundation published today concludes that in many cases, the long term health of 16- to 24-year-olds is being jeopardised by socioeconomic factors and a lack of public services. “To be healthy, everyone needs a job, a friend, somewhere to live and education or job opportunities,” says Jo Bibby, director of health at the Health Foundation. “Conversely, not having those things increases the chances of illness later in life.”

Part of its two-year inquiry into young people’s future health, the report brings together the results of six months’ qualitative interviews and workshops with over 600 young people – including around 80 who directly helped with the research – and those providing services in Bradford, Bristol, Denbighshire in Wales, Lisburn in Northern Ireland and North Ayrshire in Scotland to see to what extent 12- to 24-year-olds across the UK today have the building blocks to become healthy adults. Young people...

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Despite government promises, mental health services are still failing young people. Here, some of those affected speak out

The word “crisis” comes up a lot whenever children and young people’s mental health is mentioned. Whether it’s youngsters in desperate need of acute care being sent hundreds of miles away for treatment due to local bed shortages, failure to receive help even after their GP has referred them for specialist care, or enduring problems with NHS child and adolescent mental health services (Camhs), patients under 18 find it increasingly difficult to access the support they need.

Related: Young people’s mental health is a ‘worsening crisis’. Action is needed | Mary O’Hara

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Deaths often driven by ‘despair caused by the history of dispossession’, report says

A Senate inquiry into mental health in rural and remote areas has found that suicide has long since reached a crisis level in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, and “that this has been allowed to continue unchecked for so long is to Australia’s shame”.

The inquiry released its final report on Tuesday, finding that mental health services for all people in rural and remote areas were lacking, but “in too many cases, the causes of suicide for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people is not mental illness, but despair caused by the history of dispossession combined with the social and economic conditions in which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples live”.

Related: Can we handle the truth? Indigenous Australians depend on it | Paul Daley

Related: Australia's drought crisis and farmers' stories of anxiety, fear and resilience

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More over-45s are arriving at hospital with drug-related mental health issues, but there’s a myriad of reasons why

If you can remember the 60s, you weren’t really there, and all that. The baby boomer generation – that of Woodstock and the Isle of Wight festival and Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, the generation inspired by On The Road and Naked Lunch – was always famous for its liberal attitude to drug-taking, among many other things.

Now, it seems, that lifestyle may have caught up with them. According to new NHS data on drug misuse, there has been an 85% increase in hospital admissions for “drug-related mental and behavioural disorders” among the over-45s in the last 10 years.

Related: NHS hospitals treat soaring number of older people for drug misuse

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System neglects ‘missing middle’ of the population who face common problems

A landmark inquiry has found New Zealand’s mental health services are overwhelmed and geared towards crisis care rather than the wider population who are experiencing increasing rates of depression, trauma and substance abuse.

It has urged the government to widen provision of mental health care from 3% of the population in critical need to “the missing middle” – the 20% of the population who struggle with“common, disabling problems” such as anxiety.

Related: 'We need to change': Death of New Zealand newsreader puts spotlight on depression

We can’t medicate or treat our way out of the epidemic of mental distress.

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Research showing level of risk to people heavily in debt leads to calls for change to law

  • Case study: ‘The council was more aggressive than the payday lenders’

More than 100,000 people a year in England who are mired in heavy debt try to end their lives, new research has revealed.

Intimidating and threatening letters sent by debt collectors, bailiffs and councils raise the risk of suicide by adding to people’s feelings of despair, the study found. The findings have prompted calls from mental health experts for an urgent overhaul of the tactics banks, utility companies, credit card companies and others use to pursue people struggling to repay money they owe.

The last thing those struggling with debts need is a bunch of near thuggish letters dropping through the letterbox

*People with multiple debts are five times more likely to have tried to kill themselves than those with one debt.

Almost a quarter (23%) of those who made a suicide attempt last year were in problem debt.

The “double stigma” around debt and suicide means many of those who are struggling do not tell anyone how they are feeling or seek help.

In the UK, Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. In...

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There is a wealth of information about your health circulating in your blood. For people with diabetes, accessing that information can be a matter of life or death. For nearly 30 years, the prevailing technology for checking the blood sugars of someone with diabetes has been the fingerstick. People with diabetes are often asked to […]

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This article is sponsored by Careers by KevinMD.com. When George W. “Billy” Campbell, MD, walks down the street, he never knows who — or what — he’s going to encounter. Anything can happen when you’re the doctor at Foothills Family Medicine of Westminster, South Carolina, a small town with a population of only 2,500. “I’ve […]

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Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 42-year-old man arrives for follow-up consultation. Three months ago he developed a proximal right leg deep venous thrombosis following a skiing-related fracture of the right tibia. Although not recommended by guidelines, a thrombophilia evaluation was performed, which revealed an elevated […]

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For longer than anyone could remember, he was the rural community’s pharmacist.  A skilled compounder of prescriptions, he was conversant in chocolates, greeting cards, and how to obviate a trip to the doctor’s office by using an over-the-counter remedy. A devoted family man, he was involved in many civic and church activities. Most have forgotten […]

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It was during the first few weeks of medical school that I realized that I was joining a secret society. Like many physicians, I was called to medicine at a young age. For me, it was Doctor Beverly Crusher from Star Trek: The Next Generation. I admired her — I wanted to be who she […]

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I was moved when a family entrusted me to give a eulogy for their beloved. This great privilege highlighted a hallmark of a physician’s service to humanity: “to cure sometimes, alleviate often, but comfort always.” But I was horrified to learn that his death at the hospital may have been the result of a preventable […]

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An excerpt from Are You the F**king Doctor?: Tales from the bleeding edge of medicine. The vein stands up proudly. It’s good to look at; it’s inviting. The tourniquet is satisfyingly tight, the syringe waits like a shark on the bedside table, the new orange needle catches a glint of light, a silver gleam of expectancy, […]

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We know the statistics. More than 50 percent of physicians are experiencing burnout at the hands of EMRs, a nonexistent work-life balance and regulatory constraints to name a few. This is causing physicians to leave clinical medicine and find other work. Some are opting for nonclinical administrative roles, and others are leaving altogether for careers […]

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Research for Gateshead council finds system increases depression and anxiety

Universal credit has become a serious threat to public health, doctors have said, after a study revealed that the stress of coping with the new benefits system had so profoundly affected claimants’ mental health that some considered suicide.

Public health researchers found overwhelmingly negative experiences among vulnerable claimants, including high levels of anxiety and depression, as well as physical problems and social isolation exacerbated by hunger and destitution.

Related: 'I'm scared to eat sometimes': UN envoy meets UK food bank users

Related: How did universal credit go so badly wrong? – podcast

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Robert Wightmore and Wally Johns respond to Mariam Alexander’s article on sectioning patients under the Mental Health Act

Mariam Alexander’s article (What’s it really like to section a patient? I wish I didn’t know, 12 November) brought back memories of numerous mental health assessments during my career as an approved mental health professional (AMHP), with my original core training in social work. Dr Alexander correctly states that a MHA involves three professionals: two doctors and an AMHP. She and the second doctor have the right to complete a recommendation for a patient to be detained under the Mental Health Act (MHA), but do not have the power to admit the patient to hospital until the AMHP is satisfied that the grounds for admission have been met. He or she will then complete a separate application for detention.

Similar articles in the past relating to admissions to psychiatric hospitals have often overlooked the role of the AMHP, who has overall responsibility under the MHA to stage-manage the assessment from beginning to end, which also involves identifying and communicating with the patient’s nearest relative. AMHPs are also obliged under the MHA to ensure that all...

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As a GP, I know that conventional medicine can’t solve the growing problems of obesity, stress and loneliness. But funding is key

It is no secret that the government likes “social prescribing”. Last month’s loneliness strategy included proposals for GPs to refer patients to art groups, cookery classes and other activities. And speaking at last week’s King’s Fund conference on the subject, the health and social care secretary, Matt Hancock, announced the creation of an academy to build a research base, train practitioners and champion the benefits of social prescribing. He wants to see a nationwide network of social prescribing projects that encourage individuals to take part in a range of activities including the arts, exercise, and nutritional advice.

Related: Combat loneliness with 'social prescribing', says Theresa May

Related: Lonely people need local connections – don’t make a song and dance of it | Geraldine Bedell

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Commons committee hears evidence of effects of digital age on young people’s health

Social media is wrongly blamed for mental health issues in young people when the real culprit is austerity, a parliamentary committee has heard.

Taking evidence on the effects of social media on young people’s health, the Commons science and technology committee was told by the mental health campaigner Natasha Devon that “in focusing so much on social media … we can sometimes take our eye off other things”.

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New research spells it out: the psychological impact of judgmental attitudes and a fat-shaming culture is profound

Obesity and depression: a chicken-and-egg situation that baffles and beguiles medical health professionals in surgeries and academic journals equally. Which truly comes first in this ouroboros of NHS resource drains – the incapacity to feel fully and interact with the world around you, or getting the 12-pack box of doughnuts instead of just the three because screw-it-I-deserve-some-happiness-today-don’t-I?

That depression is more common in those who are overweight is known in medical circles probably about as well as tired chicken-and-egg allusions are among regular folk who didn’t have the requisite level of smarts to take a Hippocratic oath. The first issue so often flows into the other, and back the other way around too, becoming all tangled up together in the everyday without us even noticing.

Related: With ‘food deserts’ everywhere, it’s no wonder so many Brits are obese | Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett

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The chair of the Welsh assembly’s young people committee, is calling for urgent action to increase support for children’s mental health

Lynne Neagle is a Welsh politician who by her own account is “like a terrier” when it comes to following things through. In her sights is the rising tide of emotional and mental distress among children and young people.

Neagle, who has served on the National Assembly for Wales as the Labour member for Torfaen since devolution in 1999, says it’s high time for a “step-change” of approach in Wales. As chair of the cross-party children, young people and education committee, she wants the Welsh government to make the emotional and mental wellbeing and resilience of children and young people a national priority. And she is adamant that “this has got to be sorted out now”.

Related: Children in prison aren’t coping - but nobody seems to care

Related: Britain has created a crisis in childhood, says former children’s commissioner

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Open letter signed by unions and big employers calls on PM to prioritise manifesto pledges

Business leaders and unions have called for mental health to be given the same weight as physical first aid in workplace legislation.

An open letter urging Theresa May to prioritise manifesto pledges to act on mental health has been signed by some of Britain’s biggest employers, including Royal Mail, WH Smith, Mace, Channel 4 and Ford, as well as the Unite union.

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Dead Dog on the Left isn’t just a documentary about the use of ecstasy in treating PTSD, it’s a story of the lengths one former marine will go to for friendship

The scene, at first, seems to be of two mates reminiscing about the good old days. Relaxing on the porch with a beer, tattoos poking out from under his shirt sleeves, Tyler Flanigan roundly mocks his fellow former marine Nigel McCourry.

“Remember that first patrol we went on, outside the gate, when we went into Condition One?” Flanigan says, barely able to get out the words. “You were like, ‘DEAD DOG ON THE LEFT!’”

Related: ‘My therapist gave me a pill’: can MDMA help cure trauma?

Related: Magic Medicine review – making the case for mushrooms

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At 24, he wanted to kill himself. Now a novelist, he teaches the readers of his books – and his children – how to get through when the future looks bleak

On a September day in Ibiza, the air scented with sea and pine, Matt Haig – then 24 – walked to a cliff edge planning to kill himself. He stopped one step away.

Reasons to Stay Alive, his account of this unravelling, the strange hell of depression and anxiety and his journey back from the edge, would become a bestseller 16 years later. Already a novelist by the time he wrote it, Haig saw the book as a “side project”, though it was anything but. Within weeks, he was getting 1,000 emails a day from grateful readers. Strangers stopped him on the street to thank him. Celebrity admirers included Steven Fry, Jo Brand and Ruby Wax – and Haig was catapulted into the role of mental health campaigner.

My kids know I love life, but sometimes I have these dips

Terrible things make the good ones shine brighter

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Depression, anxiety, panic attacks - it’s a major risk factor for mental health in adulthood. This Anti-Bullying Week, let’s encourage empathy and kindness

A scene that often replays in my mind is being 13 years old, curled up in the foetal position on the floor and being kicked in the ribs. I’m screaming but then my voice catches and becomes a silence that sticks as a lump in the throat that stays there for years.

Bullying – which can be physical, mental, emotional, verbal – can steal a lot, including our confidence and self-esteem. It can also steal language, the ability to express what we have experienced.

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From knife crime to special needs and mental health, a lack of care caused by austerity is undermining the fabric of society

Shirley (not her real name) tried her best. As her son grew into adolescence and became increasingly wayward she sought help. She enrolled in parenting classes, asked the council to relocate her family out of the London borough of Brent and had endless meetings with social workers and psychologists. She sought referrals for mental health assessments but was told her son Sean (not his real name) did not meet the threshold. She sent an email to her MP with the heading “PLEASE HELP ME SAVE MY SON!!!”

A few months later she warned Brent social workers: “If we don’t do something, he’s either going to end up dead or someone’s going to end up in a body bag.” Less than two years after that Sean, by then 15, stabbed another 15-year-old to death and is now in prison. When his mother forwarded her email chain with the council to me, many responses carried the sign-off: “Brent Council needs to save £54m over the next two years …”

Children are going where most profit can be made from them. One careworker has described it as legalised trafficking

Related: Number of...

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As a teacher, I’ve seen an incredible increase in mental health issues among HSC students that cannot be dismissed

At the end of 2017 I was appointed to the role of head of year 12. It came as a bit of a surprise as, in a teaching career spanning over 40 years, I had never been appointed head of anything.

What attracted me to this position was that it gave me an opportunity to play an active role in shepherding year 12 through their higher school certificate (HSC) year. I didn’t quite know how I was going to do it but having taught year 12 for many years, I did know that for some inexplicable reason the pressure on students in their final years has multiplied exponentially.

Way back in my day, 'stress' wasn’t a word I was familiar with. Nor were many of my peers

Related: The children are rioting in the streets! They are deadly serious and perhaps our last hope | First Dog on the Moon

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I have two Achilles’ heels.  Two mental health issues that continually challenge me no matter how introspective and self-aware I become.  One is food.  I have talked before about how food was my money.  As annoying as that can be, I feel like I have a good hold on that one.  With the right intentions and […]

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Nearly a quarter of a century ago (good heavens, I can hardly believe I have to say that!), when I was just starting out as a junior faculty attending, I remember one of my mentors taking me to the hospital with him on morning rounds to see all of his patients who were admitted to […]

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Preparing for medical school demands displaying your passion for both medicine and helping others. Like medical schools, other graduate school programs (think: business or law) require strong grades, test scores, leadership experience, and resumes. But medical school requires so much more than that. Good extracurricular activities for medical school are a particularly important part of the application […]

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We’ve all heard about the importance of greater stakeholder collaboration in health care. It’s the premise of current movements aimed at improving the outlook on some of the most costly, chronic conditions. Like most physicians today, I maintain a tight work schedule to keep bottom-line margins in the black. On a daily basis, I see […]

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It’s a common scenario: a patient shows up to my office lugging a bagful of over-the-counter supplements, defiantly informing me that they “don’t believe in prescription drugs.” In the very next breath, they present a lab slip with a list of bloodwork that their alternative medicine doctor wants me to order to help diagnose their […]

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Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 79-year-old man is evaluated for pain in the buttocks region. He was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin large B-cell lymphoma 6 months ago. Although his lymphoma has responded well to therapy and he is without evidence of active disease, he required hospitalization […]

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Early voting began recently in Texas with unprecedented excitement, as a record 15 million registered voters made their way to the polls. Reports say polls are looking more like Black Friday shopping lines than early voting locations. Although we cannot predict the results of the election, one thing is clear: healthcare is the top issue. This is […]

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Gladys Saroli’s frontotemporal dementia is a cruel disease but her husband, Jose, spends every day by her side

Gladys Saroli’s hand is warm and soft to the touch. She gives mine a gentle squeeze.

“Hola,” she greets me softly, but soon turns back to the daytime television that fills the common room. Her husband, Jose, is all smiles and handshakes beneath his black cap advertising Peru, the country of their birth, and observes: “Gladys, she look good and well.”

Clockwise from top: The door to Gladys’s room, and inside the room, which is adorned with labelled photographs and cues to assist with her dementia.

There is no cure for frontotemporal dementia and no treatment to alleviate symptoms

Gladys Saroli in her room.

Family birthdays she come back to our house in Epping. She is looking, looking. She is happy.

Clockwise from top: Jose comforts Gladys in the living room, Jose assists Gladys with her dinner.

No way. This is not what’s meant to be

Jose wipes Gladys’s brow as she drifts off to sleep.

Clockwise from top: Jose Saroli, and Jose assists Gladys in the bathroom.

There are so many factors in ensuring a person with dementia has good quality of life

As her dementia has worsened, Gladys is...

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About this site

Mental health is a level of psychological well-being, or an absence of a mental disorder; it is the "psychological state of someone who is functioning at a satisfactory level of emotional and behavioral adjustment".

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14 December 2018