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I have two Achilles’ heels.  Two mental health issues that continually challenge me no matter how introspective and self-aware I become.  One is food.  I have talked before about how food was my money.  As annoying as that can be, I feel like I have a good hold on that one.  With the right intentions and […]

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Nearly a quarter of a century ago (good heavens, I can hardly believe I have to say that!), when I was just starting out as a junior faculty attending, I remember one of my mentors taking me to the hospital with him on morning rounds to see all of his patients who were admitted to […]

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Preparing for medical school demands displaying your passion for both medicine and helping others. Like medical schools, other graduate school programs (think: business or law) require strong grades, test scores, leadership experience, and resumes. But medical school requires so much more than that. Good extracurricular activities for medical school are a particularly important part of the application […]

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We’ve all heard about the importance of greater stakeholder collaboration in health care. It’s the premise of current movements aimed at improving the outlook on some of the most costly, chronic conditions. Like most physicians today, I maintain a tight work schedule to keep bottom-line margins in the black. On a daily basis, I see […]

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It’s a common scenario: a patient shows up to my office lugging a bagful of over-the-counter supplements, defiantly informing me that they “don’t believe in prescription drugs.” In the very next breath, they present a lab slip with a list of bloodwork that their alternative medicine doctor wants me to order to help diagnose their […]

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Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 79-year-old man is evaluated for pain in the buttocks region. He was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin large B-cell lymphoma 6 months ago. Although his lymphoma has responded well to therapy and he is without evidence of active disease, he required hospitalization […]

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Early voting began recently in Texas with unprecedented excitement, as a record 15 million registered voters made their way to the polls. Reports say polls are looking more like Black Friday shopping lines than early voting locations. Although we cannot predict the results of the election, one thing is clear: healthcare is the top issue. This is […]

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Gladys Saroli’s frontotemporal dementia is a cruel disease but her husband, Jose, spends every day by her side

Gladys Saroli’s hand is warm and soft to the touch. She gives mine a gentle squeeze.

“Hola,” she greets me softly, but soon turns back to the daytime television that fills the common room. Her husband, Jose, is all smiles and handshakes beneath his black cap advertising Peru, the country of their birth, and observes: “Gladys, she look good and well.”

Clockwise from top: The door to Gladys’s room, and inside the room, which is adorned with labelled photographs and cues to assist with her dementia.

There is no cure for frontotemporal dementia and no treatment to alleviate symptoms

Gladys Saroli in her room.

Family birthdays she come back to our house in Epping. She is looking, looking. She is happy.

Clockwise from top: Jose comforts Gladys in the living room, Jose assists Gladys with her dinner.

No way. This is not what’s meant to be

Jose wipes Gladys’s brow as she drifts off to sleep.

Clockwise from top: Jose Saroli, and Jose assists Gladys in the bathroom.

There are so many factors in ensuring a person with dementia has good quality of life

As her dementia has worsened, Gladys is...

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A report says that early intervention is crucial to our children’s futures. But in Westminster, only quick gains seem to matter

Just imagine: “Mr Speaker, it is clear that the developmental issues affecting millions of UK children are so severe, and of such enormous long-term cost to our country, that only a concerted national programme of early intervention will suffice. I propose to make that investment the centrepiece of this budget in the full knowledge that the benefits will be reaped by future governments, not my own.”

No, we did not hear that from Philip Hammond in his budget statement this week. Nor are we likely to hear it from any chancellor, of any political stripe, any time soon. In the UK’s political system, the short term is all. Yet it is increasingly evident that focused, long-term support for children and young people at risk of poor outcomes, such as mental health problems, limited academic attainment or involvement in crime, must be key to tackling what former children’s commissioner for England Sir Al Aynsley-Green describes in a new book as Britain’s “childhood crisis”.

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Pressure on NHS will continue as social care remains underfunded, campaigners say

Health experts have said the chancellor’s £20.5bn boost for the NHS in England by 2023 will leave the service still struggling to cope with rising demand for treatment.

The pressure on already overloaded A&E and GP services will continue because Philip Hammond only gave an extra £650m to prop up crumbling social care services, it was claimed.

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The chancellor’s £2bn pledges are a step forward – yet even more funding for early intervention is critical

Mental health crisis support in all A&E departments, as the chancellor, Philip Hammond, set out in the budget, is critical. The almost fivefold increase in young people showing up at A&E with psychiatric problems in the past decade makes the case for this clearly.

But why should people with mental illness be able to access care only when they feel they have nowhere to turn but A&E? Lara Ferguson’s case proves this. Her case was highlighted in a report by the Centre for Mental Health, which revealed that young people are waiting for months, if not years, for help. When Lara was 15, she consulted her GP about depression but was told it was probably just a “normal teenage problem” and that she should visit self-help websites. Lara’s school tried to refer her to child and adolescent mental health services because she was self-harming, but was told the only way to access specialist services was through A&E.

Related: Mental health services to get £2bn funding boost in budget

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It is practically a professional requirement that actors be emotional and vulnerable, but only recently has protecting their mental wellbeing become a priority

Actor and playwright Milly Thomas is sick of the image of the tortured artist. “There’s nothing romantic or glamorous about depression,” she says. But Thomas believes that the idea persists, particularly for performers. Actors are expected to expose themselves emotionally, often with little regard for how it affects their states of mind. At the same time, they work in a profession characterised by instability, in which self-worth often rests on their ability to get the next role.

Until recently, however, little attention had been paid to the relationship between acting and mental health. One of the reasons Thomas wrote her solo play Dust, an unflinching look at one young woman’s suicide, was because she was frustrated with reductive understandings of mental health. She recalls her own experience of depression: “I was very, very ill, but also completely able to get out of bed every day and go to work and do my job, and I think that’s a blessing and a curse. I just thought, ‘We’re not talking about this.’”

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Philip Hammond says measures being announced in budget depend on reaching Brexit deal

Philip Hammond will announce a £2bn real-terms increase in mental health funding on Monday as he unveils his first budget since Theresa May told the Conservative party conference that voters needed to know austerity was over.

The commitment should lead to comprehensive mental health support being available in every large A&E department. It suggests that mental health, long seen as a neglected area within the NHS, will benefit disproportionately from the annual health funding increase of up to £6bn a year announced by the prime minister in June.

Related: Mental health patients need these new A&E units – but much more too | Wendy Burn

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A new study calls for a £200m government scheme to promote reading. That sounds like a fairytale idea to me

“We read to know we are not alone,” wrote CS Lewis. He was clearly on to something. A new report claims that books are powerful enough to halt loneliness and social exclusion. The 50-page study, undertaken jointly by the thinktank Demos and the literacy charity the Reading Agency, argues that reading could also assist with social mobility and mental health, and even “hold off” dementia. It backs its argument with an array of compelling research and recommends a government investment of £200m, involving the NHS supporting “book-based interventions”, as part of its social prescribing strategy, alongside a major Comic Relief-style campaign to raise money for book charities, book circles and reading aloud schemes.

Related: The Tories are savaging libraries – and closing the book on social mobility | John Harris

Related: May appoints minister to tackle loneliness issues raised by Jo Cox

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An ex-Observer journalist on her battle with depression, and the creation of a celebration of women with complicated lives

Not long after my 30th birthday – which I spent cry-dancing in a random club with baffled strangers – I went to my GP and was diagnosed with depression. In some ways it was a relief. The feelings of hopelessness, inadequacy, unworthiness and loneliness with which I’d struggled since my teenage years finally had an explanation. It was caused by dodgy brain chemistry, serotonin deficiencies. Even better, there was a treatment and it was simple and easy to swallow.

For the next five years I took Prozac for depression and propranolol for anxiety. They helped. Work was also a crutch. After a brief and improbable career as a teacher in a private school, where the pupils were as self-confident as I was self-conscious, I quit for the glamour of journalism – well, the Oban Times. I then, via the Glasgow Herald, joined the Observer, technically as Scotland editor, though a more accurate description could have been the panicker in the north.

I began to see that I was a hopeless communicator in relationships, especially with emotions such as anger, shame, envy

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Some degree of distress just proves the process is working

‘Get help and get happy!” runs a tagline for one of the new generation of e-counselling services, offering psychotherapy by text, phone and video chat. Except it turns out that getting happy is by no means guaranteed to be therapy’s only outcome. One recent paper (which I found via the excellent Research Digest blog) estimates that, when it comes to cognitive behavioural therapy, 43% of clients will experience unwanted side-effects like distress, a deterioration in their symptoms, or strained family relations. “Psychotherapy is not harmless,” the paper’s authors conclude. It’s useful research. But that conclusion highlights a widespread belief about therapy that gets stranger the longer you dwell on it: why on earth would anyone assume it was harmless in the first place?

There are echoes, here, of the surprise that greets media revelations that mindfulness meditation – another seemingly guaranteed path to happiness – has its perils. Beginners, especially if they’ve experienced trauma, sometimes report emotional “flooding”: once they turn their attention inwards, and follow the instructions to notice their emotions without...

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This legislation will help ensure mental health units are the caring, therapeutic environments they should be for all patients, write Jemima Olchawski of Agenda, Deborah Coles of Inquest and six others

That the mental health units (use of force) bill became law today is fantastic news for patients and staff in mental health units across the country. This legislation aims to reduce the widespread use of distressing and potentially dangerous restraint against both children and adults, which results in thousands of injuries every year and is linked to dozens of deaths.

Aside from the physical damage, it can also have a devastating impact on patients’ psychological wellbeing, retraumatising those who have experienced violence and abuse. The act, also known as Seni’s law after Seni Lewis, who died after being excessively restrained by police officers while a patient in a mental health hospital (Report, 7 February 2017), will improve accountability in mental health units.

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Public Health England says treatment rise likely to be related to drug being more prevalent

The number of people being treated for problems related to crack cocaine use in England has increased by 44% in two years, official figures show.

There was also a small (3%) increase in people entering treatment for both crack cocaine and opiate use, statistics released by Public Health England (PHE) reveal. The rise was seen primarily in those aged 35 and over.

Related: Rise in cocaine deaths prompts calls for government action

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Healthcare that is preventive rather than reactive is key if this epidemic is to be tackled effectively

Loneliness is thought to be a universal, inevitable, even psychological affliction. Not only the United Kingdom but also vast swaths of post-industrial populations across Europe, the United States and Japan report heightened levels of loneliness, with attendant implications for public health.

The findings of a recent BBC loneliness survey – that a third of respondents (55,000 in the UK) often felt lonely, that there was shame attached, that it could affect people of all life stages, that it was connected to social media use and linked with ill health – flesh out the detail behind discussion of a “loneliness epidemic”. But neither the physicality of loneliness, nor its origins, received much emphasis in the study. And as its history makes clear, loneliness is more complex than much of the current analysis suggests.

Before 1800, the English word ‘loneliness' did not exist

Related: Lonely people need local connections – don’t make a song and dance of it | Geraldine Bedell

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Victorian judgment said patients’ human rights had been undermined

A court in Victoria has strengthened protections for mental health patients fighting forced electroconvulsive shock therapy, ruling that treatment orders cannot undermine a person’s human rights.

The court upheld an appeal brought by Victoria Legal Aid against two decisions in the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (Vcat) and the Mental Health Tribunal that two patients who had been diagnosed with schizophrenia be subject to a course of ECT against their will.

Related: Patients challenge order to undergo electroconvulsive treatment

Related: What is ECT and how does it work?

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Ariana Grande, Selena Gomez and Justin Bieber are among the stars using social media to counter industry pressures

Our pop stars are burning out. Ariana Grande, after a hellish year marked by a cancelled engagement, a terror attack and the death of an ex-boyfriend, has hit back at fans angry over the delay to her latest music video: “Been thru hell and back and i’m doing my best to keep going”. Selena Gomez, currently receiving mental health treatment, posted on Instagram: “I am taking a social media break. Again.” Even Rihanna, widely perceived as impervious to industry pressures, became short with an interviewer last month when asked, yet again, when she plans on releasing new music. “Who sent you?” she replied.

Why now? The pop industry has never been particularly kind to its artists. Derided as the most commercial (and therefore least serious) music genre, its stars are often regarded less as human beings, more as vessels for bangers. The factory-line churn of having to release an album every two years, with a promotional cycle followed by a world tour – all while maintaining a pleasant, marketable and “always on” public persona – has always been a pressure.

can i pls have one...

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Value remains one of the most widely invoked and variably interpreted concept in American health care delivery. Beyond patients, stakeholder groups across the health care ecosystem are undertaking value-based initiatives, including payers (e.g., value-based insurance design and payments), provider organizations (e.g., value-based care redesign), pharmaceutical companies and pharmacy benefits managers (e.g., value-based pricing and formularies), […]

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In academic medicine, promotion depends on the weight of our curricula vitae, measured primarily by the number of papers we publish in peer-reviewed journals. Physicians strive to jump through the hoops of publishing their work in “top” journals ranked by the “impact factor” (yearly average number of citations for a given journal). Yet the “impact […]

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The topic of paying for long-term care is an overlooked issue in health care. None of us want to think about living our final days in the nursing home, but statistically speaking, many of us will. How will you pay for it? What are the options? Long-term care in this country can be divided into […]

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When I was first reading up on JM (identifying information changed), I thought the case would go smoothly, well, as smoothly as any inpatient psychiatry case can go. All I had known about her is that she was an elderly woman who was recently released from jail. When the staff came to escort JM to […]

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Medicine has created a culture where public embarrassment, bullying, and passive-aggression have become pedagogy. How can we seek to care for others, when we treat our own so cruelly? I recently met Angie (name changed), a young university student who had entered the clinical years of medical school. Like many, she was introduced to medicine […]

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First of all, many osteopathic medical schools are located in underserved areas — or as underserved as possible while still having enough of a medical community to make training possible. My school, LMU-DCOM is located in the middle of Appalachia, for example. Osteopathic medical schools generally encourage students to specialize in primary care, at least […]

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The medicine I practiced between 1974 to 1992 is gone. Evidence is the coin of the realm in the courts of modern medicine. The rule “first, do no harm” demands a corollary — be paranoid. We receive extensive training and licensure to “touch” patients. Any person who is not a physician who cuts into another […]

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Evidence suggests memory decline can be slowed and even reversed by adopting a few healthy lifestyle habits

Brain health is key to successful ageing, and it involves several mental functions including memory, reasoning and planning. Memory defines who we are – without memory we have no past, cannot plan for the future and are unable to enjoy the present. Our reasoning and planning skills help us create and maintain healthy lifestyle habits that protect our bodies and minds.

People are living much longer than ever before. Those born in 1900 would have been lucky to reach their 50th birthday. Today, life expectancy in many countries exceeds 80, but unfortunately age-related diseases such as Alzheimer’s and diabetes can diminish quality of life.

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We check our phones every 12 minutes, often just after waking up. Always-on behaviour is harmful to long-term mental health, and we need to learn to the hit the pause button

It is difficult to imagine life before our personal and professional worlds were so dominated and “switched on” via smartphones and the other devices that make us accessible and, crucially, so easily distractible and interruptible every second of the day. This constant fragmentation of our time and concentration has become the new normal, to which we have adapted with ease, but there is a downside: more and more experts are telling us that these interruptions and distractions have eroded our ability to concentrate.

We have known for a long time that repeated interruptions affect concentration. In 2005, research carried out by Dr Glenn Wilson at London’s Institute of Psychiatry found that persistent interruptions and distractions at work had a profound effect. Those distracted by emails and phone calls saw a 10-point fall in their IQ, twice that found in studies on the impact of smoking marijuana. More than half of the 1,100 participants said they always responded to an email immediately or as soon as...

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Duke and Duchess of Sussex don leis on Sydney sand to shine spotlight on mental health

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex, Prince Harry and Meghan Markle, have again wowed crowds in Sydney – on the sands of Bondi beach in the morning, before the prince climbed the Sydney Harbour Bridge on Friday afternoon.

Prince Harry and prime minister Scott Morrison climbed the bridge to raise the flag for the Invictus Games.

Related: Prince Harry and Meghan in Melbourne: bush tucker, the beach and a bit of footy

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Victoria MP says entrenched loneliness is so serious it requires government intervention

Australia is becoming an increasingly lonely place, so much so that one party is turning it into an election issue.

Social isolation affects one in 10 Australians, while one in six experience periods of emotional loneliness.

Related: Loneliness is finally being recognised as a risk to health. But this is just the start | Laura Alcock-Ferguson

Related: Loneliness as bad for health as long-term illness, says GPs' chief

Related: Eighty-two per cent of Australians say loneliness is increasing, Lifeline survey finds

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With more and more children seeking psychological help, Matt Haig is one of a wave of authors trying to reach troubled youngsters with stories

Matt Haig is feeling hopeful. His first ever illustrated story, The Truth Pixie, is published in the UK on Thursday – and he is optimistic it will encourage young children to talk about their anxieties. “It’s a book I want parents to share with their children – a read-aloud bedtime story,” Haig says. “Bedtime is a time when children’s heads are full of fears, and those don’t go away by just ignoring them. They go away by talking about them, externalising them and dealing with them.”

While his books for children are usually full of jokes, Haig’s bestselling non-fiction titles for adults, Reasons to Stay Alive and Notes on a Nervous Planet, both explore his own struggles with mental illness. He says The Truth Pixie is “Reasons to Stay Alive for seven-year-olds – but with trolls and elves and silly jokes thrown in”.

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Depression, anxiety and restless sleep reported by Action for Children charity

One in three young people are suffering from mental troubles such as depression, negative feelings or inability to focus, a survey of more than 5,500 British teenagers has found.

The findings suggest that more school-age children than previously thought are struggling with their mental and emotional wellbeing, including problems sleeping properly.

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SBS’s reality show speaks frankly about mental illness. But where does its inspirational rhetoric leave those of us who don’t recover?

The single most helpful thing I ever did for my mental health was stop trying to pass as “normal”.

I stopped trying to do the things that people around me can do without thinking – go out for dinner, say, or take a slice of the birthday cake being passed around the office – that make me so anxious that my brain starts to stutter, or my chest clamps up, or I’m suddenly unable to properly breathe. I stopped trying and failing to do these things, and my life suddenly became so much less complicated. My illness stopped being so difficult to live alongside.

Related: A disappointing man is the Bachelor's shock ending? Well, this IS reality TV

Related: Filthy Rich and Homeless: can empathy alone really change how we view disadvantage?

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Cost of cross-border care doubles in four years amid beds shortage, figures show

A severe shortage of beds for patients with life-threatening eating disorders has forced the NHS to send more than 100 patients from England to Scotland for treatment since 2016, the Guardian can reveal.

At least 154 vulnerable patients, mainly women and some teenagers, had to travel hundreds of miles from their homes in order to receive residential care in Glasgow and Edinburgh, costing the NHS millions of pounds annually.

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Rather than locate the problem in the individual, let’s talk about the slashing of council budgets, legal aid and education spending

I have a radical proposal for tackling the mental health crisis. Let’s just stop talking about stigma. I’m not suggesting stigma isn’t a problem. I’ve written about it myself. But all this talk of stigma has become a politically convenient red herring.

It is another way of locating the problem in the individual, “If only he’d felt able to talk …”, and in the attitudes of others towards the individual, rather than where a very large portion of it belongs: in government policy. From attempts to demonise people on sickness benefits as morally inferior scroungers, to the decimation of social care and mental health services, to repeated failures to heed the warnings of mental health professionals, activists and carers, to the devastating impact of welfare reforms, successive Conservative governments have failed people with mental health difficulties at every conceivable turn. Not surprisingly, Theresa May wields the great stigma decoy at every opportunity. “We can end the stigma that has forced too many to suffer in silence and prevent the tragedy of...

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A range of initiatives for social workers aim to improve understanding of the problem

The scale of self-harm among young people is beyond worrying: a study published recently found that almost one in four girls aged 14 self-harmed in the past year. In the same month, the NHS reported that the number of girls aged under 18 admitted to hospital in England after self-harming had nearly doubled in the past 20 years.

Dig into what’s driving this crisis and experts working in children’s mental health will flag up a range of factors. “Part of the blame is down to higher demands from society,” argues Dr Maite Ferrin, a locum consultant psychiatrist at Haringey Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service. “Young people are being asked to be successful and good-looking and show that life is perfect [on social media].” Another alarming reason is peer pressure. “There’s a tendency for some [young] people to self-harm as a way to fit into a group because the rest of the peer are self-harming,” says Ferrin, who also works at Re:Cognition Health.

Related: Children face mental health epidemic, say teachers

The vast majority of young people involved in self-harming behaviours will not be...

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All-party report says patients forced to visit A&E as core services in England deteriorate

Growing numbers of people who experience a mental health crisis are having to visit A&E or are detained for their own safety because NHS services to help them are deteriorating, MPs and peers have warned.

The 700,000 people in England with severe mental health problems such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder also face increased delays to get treatment, they said.

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Australian GPs lambast ‘deliberate government policy which is causing the pain and suffering of these children’

Australian doctors are ramping up their campaign to have children in detention immediately removed from Nauru.

Australian Medical Association paediatric representative Dr Paul Bauert, who has treated patients on Nauru, said it was an “unconscionable” situation that could be easily avoided.

Related: UN: 'health crisis' demands closure of Australia's offshore detention centres

Related: Kerryn Phelps urges Wentworth voters to use byelection to protest 'inhumane' refugee policies

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Former Cork City, Hull City, Blackpool and Republic of Ireland Under-21 can be an example to others in the game

“I poured my heart and soul into football and all I got in return was money. That might sound strange to some people, but it’s true.” In a world where more and more professional sportsmen and women are increasingly comfortable discussing the psychological demons which plague them, the former footballer Brian Lenihan gave an extraordinary, at times chilling and vitally important interview that was broadcast last week.

Speaking to his compatriot and fellow former professional Richie Sadlier on the Player’s Chair section of the popular Second Captains World Service podcast, the 24-year-old explained how he had been living the dream – his dream, my dream and quite possibly your dream – as a young Irish player making his way in the English professional game. Having left Cork City, his hometown club, to join Hull City in 2014, the midfielder received his first call-up to the Republic of Ireland senior squad soon afterwards. Lenihan described the week he spent rubbing shoulders with Robbie Keane and others as “the best feeling ever”.

Related: Footballers seeking mental health...

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Both in and outside of health care certain buzz words and phrases become so ubiquitously used that a shared understanding is assumed despite conflicting perceptions of what these sentiments actually mean. Examples in health care include: shared decision making, quality of life, professionalism, patient-centered care, and evidence-based. Each sounds positive and intuitive — what health […]

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My patient The day I met you was early in my second year of internal medicine residency. After much of my internship had been spent on arduous inpatient rotations, I was finally ready to lead my own team of young doctors and students on a high-acuity wards service. Yet, in my continuity clinic, I was […]

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There is a taboo in medicine. It is becoming less prominent, but it still exists. You’re not supposed to talk about money. Not how much something costs a patient, not how much you get paid, not how you invest, and certainly not about the freedom from medicine that financial independence can bring. This first shows up […]

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There’s an ugly undercurrent that sometimes shows up in the emergency department: indeed all over the world of medicine. I’ve seen it in doctors and nurses alike. It’s a meanness, a smallness, a kind of moral judgment that can lead us to make poor medical decisions. Or it can simply make us poorer in spirit. […]

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Pledge to boost services undermined by failure to retain thousands of key workers, minister admits

Thousands of nurses, therapists and psychiatrists are quitting NHS mental health services, raising serious doubts about ministerial pledges to dramatically expand the workforce.

Two thousand mental health staff a month are leaving their posts in the NHS in England, according to figures from the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC). The news comes as services are already seriously understaffed and struggling to cope with a surge in patients seeking help for anxiety, depression and other disorders.

Related: Mental health issues in young people up sixfold in England since 1995

Related: One in three freshers 'show symptoms of mental health disorder'

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She said I had cancer, and an eating disorder, and pneumonia. I didn’t realize it was abuse until years later

I felt the cold metal of the tool through my shirt as she checked my spine for deformities. I was filled with panic, and a certainty that I had scoliosis. I pictured my spine twisted. Would I need a back brace? Eventually a wheelchair? I got lightheaded and said I needed to stop the test.

My mom was so good at combining fact with fiction that even I got confused what was real sometimes.

She explained that Munchausen syndrome by proxy is a rare form of abuse where a caregiver invents illnesses in a child.

These Fearless Females Are Drumming Their Way Into Music’s Biggest Boys’ Club

The Gay Black American Who Stared Down Nazis in the Name of Love

I’m Nonbinary. I Loved Being Pregnant. It’s Complicated.

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Global study investigates prevalence of psychological disorders among first-year university-level students

One in three first-year university-level students report symptoms of a mental health disorder, according to a new international study.

The study investigated the prevalence of psychological disorders – including major depression, mania, generalised anxiety disorder, panic disorder, alcohol use disorder and substance use disorder – among freshers in eight different industrialised countries.

Related: Young people’s mental health: we can build a resilient generation​ | Paul Burstow

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24-year-old who reduced her medication while swimming weekly in open water was drug-and symptom-free within four months

A year ago, a 24-year-old woman with depression was given an unusual prescription by her doctor: a weekly swim in cold water.

The patient, Sarah, was filmed as part of the BBC documentary series The Doctor Who Gave Up Drugs, presented by Christoffer van Tulleken, a doctor and researcher at University College London.

Related: What's the ultimate way to defy depression, disease and early death? Exercise

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Proportion of four to 24-year-olds with mental health conditions rose to 4.8% in 2014

Six times more children and young people in England have mental health conditions than a generation ago, research has revealed.

The proportion of four to 24-year-olds who said, or whose parents said, they had a longstanding mental health condition rose from 0.8% in 1995 to 4.8% in 2014, according to a study published in the journal Psychological Medicine.

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Mental health is a level of psychological well-being, or an absence of a mental disorder; it is the "psychological state of someone who is functioning at a satisfactory level of emotional and behavioral adjustment".

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#1 Mental Health Blog – Talkspace

17 November 2018