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Recently, I had the privilege of presenting the Clinical Specialty Award for General Surgery at the 2017 Graduate Awards Celebration at Western University of Health Sciences College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific (COMP-NW). It was amazing to hear all the accomplishments and meet so many wonderful new doctors in this year’s class. I also […]

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Recently, Twitter exploded with angry commentary directed at the American Diabetes Association (ADA) after the organization actively attempted to censor what was posted on Twitter during their annual sessions in San Diego. The fiasco began when an attendee posted a picture of slides on Twitter — in an attempt to “live Tweet” during a session […]

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Having a chronic disease can be frustrating, especially when the patient seems to know more than the doctor. Unfortunately, this situation may be familiar to the millions of Americans suffering from a rare disease. In June, I had the unique experience of attending a convention for patients and health care providers to learn about one […]

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It may seem strange that a gastroenterologist like me does not prescribe pain medicines. Let me rephrase that. I don’t prescribe opioids or narcotics. I write prescriptions for so few controlled substances that I do not even know my own DEA number. You might think that a gastroenterologist who cares for thousands of patients with […]

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Female life expectancy is now 83 years but many women will spend a quarter of their lives in ill-health, finds report

Alzheimer’s disease and dementia are the biggest cause of death among women, according to a government report on the state of the nation’s health.

Related: Don’t dread old age. I’m 94, and I won’t spend my last years in fear of the Tories | Harry Leslie Smith

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Researchers admit that prevention estimate is a ‘best case scenario’, but stress that action can be taken to reduce dementia risk

More than a third of dementia cases might be avoided by tackling aspects of lifestyle including education, exercise, blood pressure and hearing, a new report suggests.

Approximately 45 million people worldwide were thought to be living with dementia in 2015, at an estimated cost of $818bn.

Related: Drop in dementia rates suggests disease can be prevented, researchers say

Related: Hearing loss could pose greater risk of potential dementia in later life – study

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Critics condemn ‘Victorian approach’ to treatment after NHS watchdog reveals 3,500 patients are kept locked in

Thousands of mental health patients are being kept in secure wards for years at a time when they should be being rehabilitated and preparing to leave hospital, a NHS watchdog has revealed.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) criticised both NHS and for-profit mental health providers for forcing such a large number of patients to endure what it called “outdated and sometimes institutionalised care”, often miles from home. The practice leaves already vulnerable patients feeling isolated and less likely to recover, the CQC warned.

Honestly think we'll look back on the mental health long term out-of-area problem as an early 21st century version of the Victorian approach

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IPPR thinktank says permanently excluded children in England face significant disadvantage because of ‘broken system’

Half of all pupils expelled from school are suffering from a recognised mental health problem, according to a study.

Those who are permanently excluded find themselves at a significant disadvantage, with only one in a hundred going on to attain five good GCSEs, which are often used as a benchmark of academic success.

Related: Can a new technique stem England’s rising tide of school exclusions?

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Prof Pamela Taylor on mental health problems and Prof Mike Stein on the tough-on-crime youth policy

Our prison system is in crisis and is causing suffering (Editorial, 19 July). Suicide, other deaths, self-harm and violence in prisons are rising; even purpose-designed protective procedures are failing, according to the HM Inspectorate of Prisons’ report. This affects prison staff and wider society as well as prisoners. Mental disorder is common among prisoners, but even experienced clinicians cannot deliver services when, as this report highlights, they cannot reach prisoners. Some have told us they chose to leave posts rather than offer inadequate treatment. Our last government’s prisons and courts bill, to improve prison safety and effectiveness, was dropped after this year’s snap election. What is this government’s alternative?

Prison numbers – the highest in western Europe – must be reduced. The Criminal Justice Act 2003 requires courts to obtain and consider a medical report on a defendant who appears to be mentally disordered before passing a custodial sentence. But court disposals under mental health legislation are falling and the number of offenders who received a...

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From its start in 1990 until last year, Jessica Davies, who has died of cancer aged 65, was the manager of the Cherry Tree Nursery, a commercial plant nursery in Dorset set up to give a meaningful occupation to people with mental health problems.

She helped take a derelict four-acre site near Christchurch and create a community and place of safety, where growing plants brought some happiness to volunteers and helped restore their dignity. The Cherry Tree Nursery has inspired many similar projects.

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All-party inquiry demonstrates benefits to health and wellbeing of the arts, leading to fall in hospital admissions

GPs prescribing arts activities to some patients could lead to a dramatic fall in hospital admissions and save the NHS money, according to a report into the subject of arts, health and wellbeing published after two years of evidence gathering.

The report, published on Wednesday, includes hundreds of interviews and dozens of case studies showing how powerfully the arts can promote health and wellbeing.

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What can advances in neuroscience and psychology reveal about this age-old phenomenon? And how might digital avatars help patients answer back?

Subscribe & Review on iTunes, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud & Acast, and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter

Once thought to originate from the realm of the supernatural, auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) have a well-documented history, with more recent times often seeing them linked to mental health issues. But with recent surveys suggesting that up to 10% of the population report hearing voices that nobody else can hear, could these hallucinations reveal the way our brains distinguish voices? And if so, how might we use this knowledge to answer back?

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Royal College of Psychiatrists says number being treated in Manchester and London has spiked since recent attacks

The number of children and young people seeking help from mental health services has spiked in the wake of recent terrorist attacks in England, according to the Royal College of Psychiatrists (RCP).

Hospitals across the Manchester region have seen an estimated 10% increase in children seeking help since a bomb ripped through the Manchester Arena on 22 May, killing 22 people, according to the RCP. Mental health experts in Greater Manchester hospitals received hundreds more patients from June to July compared with previous months.

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Doctors and healthcare professionals need to listen to young people and open up to the health and wellbeing benefits that the arts can bring

I’ve suffered from severe anxiety and depression since the age of 20. I tried again and again with many approaches to fight back against mental illness: therapy and exercise; cognitive behavioural therapy; medication; trying to be more open with the people closest to me. All of these things helped in different ways but they didn’t completely fix me.

Towards the end of my 20s I couldn’t cope. On numerous occasions I fantasised about taking my own life. I was in a lot of pain but it was a pain that nobody else could see, so it didn’t feel justifiable to me. It didn’t feel like it should have been there.

Related: 'Just go for a run': testing everyday advice for my depression | Martha Mills

Related: A moment that changed me: listening to, rather than trying to fix, my suicidal wife | Mark Lukach

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Auditory issues could be an early sign of future risk of memory and thinking problems but more research is required to unpick the link, researchers say

People who experience hearing loss could be at greater risk of memory and thinking problems later in life than those without auditory issues, research suggests.

The study focused on people who were at risk of Alzheimer’s disease, revealing that those who were diagnosed with hearing loss had a higher risk of “mild cognitive impairment” four years later.

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Child’s death, divorce or job loss linked to poorer cognition in later life, study finds, with African Americans more susceptible

Stressful life experiences can age the brain by several years, new research suggests. Experts led by a team from Wisconsin University’s school of medicine and public health in the US found that even one major stressful event early in life may have an impact on later brain health.

The team examined data for 1,320 people who reported stressful experiences over their lifetime and underwent tests in areas such as thinking and memory. The subjects’ average age was 58 and included 1,232 white Americans and 82 African Americans. A series of neuropsychological tests examined several areas, including four memory scores (immediate memory, verbal learning and memory, visual learning and memory, and story recall).

Related: Poor quality sleep could increase Alzheimer's risk, research suggests

Related: Dementia and Alzheimer's leading cause of death in England and Wales

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The co-founder of John’s Campaign on a new parliamentary report that confirms the profoundly beneficial role of the arts in helping people with dementia

A few weeks ago, turning on the radio, I hear a voice saying that creative writing can help wounds heal faster. Startled, I turn the volume up. Volunteers were given small wounds; half were then asked to write about something distressing in their life, the other half about something mundane. The wounds of the confessional writers healed substantially more quickly. A thought or a feeling is felt on the skin. Our minds, which have power over our bodies, are in our bodies and are our bodies: we cannot separate the two. Words, self-expression, can tangibly help pain and suffering. Art can be medicine, for body and soul.

Over and over again, I am reminded of the transformative power of art. Answering the phone, I hear a deep and husky voice: “Doe, a deer, a female deer.” My mother, 85, frail, registered blind, bashed about by cancer and several strokes, is having singing lessons. At school, she was made to mouth the words of songs and she never sang again until now. Eighty years after being told she was tone deaf, her voice is being...

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What few good ideas there are in this pedestrian policy initiative seem to ignore the fact that public services like ours are squeezed to breaking point

• Henry Fisher is policy director of drug policy thinktank Volteface

The wait is finally over for those of us working in the drug policy and drug treatment sectors. The Home Office published its new drug strategy on Friday, two years after its planned deadline in 2015. Sadly, however, this is not a case of good things coming to those who wait. For a 50-page document, there’s very little in the new strategy that can earn it its name.

Against a backdrop of increasing policy innovation in the wider world, the main aims of this strategy are largely unchanged from the previous 2010 version. There’s still a focus on recovery, rather than harm reduction. A continued commitment to tackling the problems caused by drugs through the criminal justice system, rather than through the health system. A point blank refusal to consider decriminalisation, or any reforms to the Misuse of Drugs Act.

Related: Chemsex drugs and former legal highs targeted by Home Office

Where is the money? Our frontline services are being overwhelmed. It seems quite...

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The constant scrutiny and criticism of AFL players, as well as the stifling nature of being a pro footballer, is creating some very anxious and depressed young men

In recent times, a number of high profile Australian rules footballers, including Mitch Clark, Lance Franklin, Travis Cloke, Alex Fasolo and Tom Boyd, have absented themselves from the game to deal with mental health problems. Each time, the reaction is the same – “Look after yourself son”, “Thanks for starting the conversation.” But each time, there’s an underlying cynicism, a certain snark that reveals itself on footy forums, in safe company and in monumental gaffes.

Every time one these stories comes to light, I ponder those heroes of my childhood, men who played with a certain joy that is conspicuously missing these days. They were the last of the part-timers – granite jawed stars who were indestructible in my eyes and probably theirs as well. Did they simply bury their demons? If so, at what cost?

Related: The loss of Martin Flanagan's AFL column is a blow to footy's soul | Russell Jackson

Coaches preach 'one in, all in' and 'leave your ego on the hook'. Yet in many ways it’s every man for himself

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Giulia’s mental health had deteriorated quickly, and I was terrified each time she spoke to me about killing herself. But then one day I was too tired to respond

• Mark Lukach is a teacher and freelance writer

One afternoon my wife, Giulia, asked me: “Mark, if I kill myself, will you promise me that you will find a new wife so that you can still be happy?” I sighed and leaned back into the chair next to her, unsure of what to say.

Actually, that’s not entirely true. I knew exactly what I wanted to say. I had been saying it for eight months. It’s just that at that moment, I was so tired – tired from work, tired from worry, tired from so many conversations about suicide – that I didn’t have the energy for it again. So I sat in silence.

Related: A moment that changed me: when the young man I tried to help took his life | Sarah Newton

Related: ‘She was radiant, way out of my league’: a story of love and mental illness

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A few days ago, just after dawn, while I was out walking the dog, our home phone rang and my wife answered it. She’s used to my pager, cell phone, and home phone ringing at all hours, and so she was not all that surprised when an unidentified voice said,”We’re looking for the methadone dose […]

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After life itself, it is said that God’s great gift is vision. 80 percent of what we learn is through vision. Babies are not born with perfect vision. They develop vision over time. A child who never developed good vision does not know what normal vision is — he or she assumes that however they […]

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A guest column by the American Society of Anesthesiologists, exclusive to KevinMD.com. Alleviating pain has been a primary focus of my career as a physician anesthesiologist. Just as there are physicians who specialize in treating conditions such as cancer, heart disease or allergies, there are specialists in treating pain. These physicians complete four years of medical school […]

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At the 8th Annual Patient Experience Summit, Adrienne Boissy, MD, MA, Chief Experience Officer at Cleveland Clinic Health System, encouraged conference attendees to “dream bigger.” So here goes.  It’s time for you to invite patients to speak to promising young doctors during their time at your respective schools. You need to invite patients for regularly scheduled […]

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I see more and more patients decline to participate in clinical trials. Simultaneously, I hear patient advocates on the national stage clamoring for better trial access. Why the disconnect? Let’s explore 7 reasons why clinical trial participation is right for you: 1. The smartest minds in medicine designed this for you. Clinical trials are not designed […]

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Every day millions of internet users ask Google life’s most difficult questions, big and small. Our writers answer some of the commonest queries

• Dr Jay Watts is a clinical psychologist, psychotherapist and senior lecturer

Depression is the curse of modernity, affecting more and more of us. It is the black dog that haunts us, the lethargy that makes it impossible to get out of bed. It is the vacuum of meaning which sucks out all our desire, our hope, so we are left in an empty void. Sadness is something we all experience, part of the fluctuations in moods that make up everyday experience. But depression? Depression is something else.

Related: Drugs alone won't cure the epidemic of depression. We need strategy | Mark Rice-Oxley

There are many of us who have been at death’s door as a result of mental health problems and yet have found a way back

Related: It’s good to talk about mental health. But is it enough? | Eva Wiseman

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Party would be ‘up for talking’ to Tories about supporting issues such as mental health and housing outside of a formal deal

Liberal Democrat MPs will consider supporting the government on key issues such as housing and mental health, but sources said the party would agree no formal deal after Theresa May’s chief of staff, Gavin Barwell, contacted his counterpart in Tim Farron’s office.

Last week, Barwell, the former MP for Croydon Central, contacted the Lib Dems to discuss circumstances where the party might back the government, but on Tuesday Lib Dem sources played down the significance of the meeting.

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Readers share stories of sleep deprivation, bullying and an institutional lack of support in a high-performing profession. They describe how they suffered and what helped them

We asked Guardian readers to share their experience about a prevalent issue among Australia’s doctors and medical students alike: unrelenting pressure, inhumane working hours and brutal competition is driving health professionals to the brink of suicide. Readers report depression, anxiety, burnout and post traumatic stress disorder.

Our call-out revealed a toxic mix of a culture of bravado, antisocial shifts and the feeling of not being able to show weakness and fragility in a profession that is expected treat to the most vulnerable members of our society.

Related: Medical training is a tragedy waiting to happen. We shouldn't be silent about it | Georgina Dent

Related: To stop doctors ending their lives, we need to hear from those suffering | Ranjana Srivastava

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Beyondblue chair acknowledges some have a genuine concern for the US president and says she had to consider her mental health during difficult moments in her prime ministership

Julia Gillard has weighed into Donald Trump’s odd Twitter behaviour, acknowledging there will be questions about his mental health.

The new chair of beyondblue and the former Australian Labor prime minister cautioned against throwing around the charge of being mentally ill as an insult but acknowledged some had a genuine concern for the president.

Related: Trump’s tweet attacking CNN is ‘un-American’, top media ethicist says

Related: The gap in the G20 agenda (and why world leaders should listen to Rihanna) | Julia Gillard

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Andrew McCulloch and Mike Coates remember the lawyer who helped Nelson Mandela escape the death penalty. Plus Giles Oakley shares the late Barry Norman’s advice about dressing up for redundancy

In his obituary of Lord Joffe (28 June), John Battersby suggests that Joffe was important among those who prevailed upon Nelson Mandela, in his famous speech from the dock in 1964, to not offer himself directly for martyrdom, thus saving the impetuous Mandela from himself. However, all of the eight defendants were found guilty of high treason, a capital crime. Nevertheless, Mr Justice Quartus de Wet deliberately chose not to impose the death penalty for reasons of state and sentenced all eight to life imprisonment. Decades later, the result of a long rapprochement between the imprisoned, moderate Mandela and the increasingly threatened apartheid state was Mandela as the first president of post-apartheid South Africa.
Andrew McCulloch
Collingham, Nottinghamshire

• Thank you for the quality and range of John Battersby’s obituary for Joel Joffe, who was one of the most gracious and inspiring people I have met. It was very pleasing to note that the piece mentioned Allied Dunbar Charitable...

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In my own odyssey through this valley of shadows I have mulled over three approaches – between them, they offer a pathway to a wider societal cure

  • Mark Rice-Oxley is author of Underneath the Lemon Tree: A Memoir of Depression and Recovery

It’s become as inevitable as the rise and rise of global temperatures or the perennial high-water mark of examination grades: another year, another record number of antidepressants dispensed by doctors up and down the country. This is one of those trends that should be both celebrated and castigated in equal measure. Celebrated, because at last we found something that can help some people deal with an insidious, depleting, often ruinous clinical condition. Castigated because if antidepressants are the answer, we’re not asking the right question.

First, the good bit. Contrary to what detractors may say, antidepressants are not addictive and there is no tolerance effect. They are not like benzodiazapines or opioids – you don’t need more and more of them to obtain the same level of relief. Theoretically, you can sit quite comfortably on the same dose for ever, though it should also be noted that there is little research into long-term usage of these...

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Brilliant clinician who was appointed professor of psychiatry of learning disability at St George’s, University of London

In 1980, Joan Bicknell, who has died aged 78 of cancer, was appointed professor of psychiatry of learning disability – the first British female professor of psychiatry – at what is now St George’s, University of London. A brilliant clinician, she put the disabled person and their family at the centre of each consultation.

She was in constant demand to speak to trainees, parent groups and learning disability services about her vision of what could be done, and published dozens of papers for both clinicians and families. An article drawn from her inaugural lecture as a professor in 1981, The Psychopathology of Handicap, was published in the journal Psychological Medicine, and remains inspirational today.

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Government policy has a role to play when it comes to dealing with rising anxiety levels

Anxiety can be good for you. It is part of the “fight or flight” reflex triggered in the presence of danger. The amygdala, the brain’s alarm system, is responsible for generating negative emotions. To prevent them flooding the brain, this part of the limbic system must be quiet. Working hard on non-emotional mental tasks inhibits the amygdala which is why keeping busy is often said to be one source of happiness. Keeping busy is not what the anxious and depressed can do – and so a cycle of misery is locked into place.

In England, new figures released last week revealed that misery appears to be escalating at an alarming scale. Prescriptions for 64.7 million items of antidepressants – an all-time high – were dispensed in 2016, the most recent annual data from NHS Digital showed. This is a staggering 108.5% increase on the 31 million antidepressants dispensed 10 years earlier.

While the young have never been better behaved, drinking and smoking less, their levels of anxiety and depression are rising

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Leading figures involved in the law, mental health and social work call on the government to ensure the detention of people with mental health problems is central to its promised review of current legislation

The increasing use of powers to detain patients with mental health problems is deeply disturbing. Reform of mental health legislation – announced in the Queen’s speech – must ensure respect for people’s rights and dignity. It must also incorporate robust, independent research into why rates of detention are increasing so rapidly and why people from some minority ethnic groups are so disproportionately the subject of detention measures. Too few people are able to access quality treatment and support when and where they need it. The root causes of the current mental health crisis – including societal factors such as poverty, addiction and austerity – must be properly investigated if we are to develop new legislation fit for our times.

The views of mental health service users and patients, their families, professionals and carers alongside a comprehensive assessment of community support and treatment options must be central to a credible review. Mental health underpins national...

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How to follow a bestselling memoir about depression? With a novel about a 400-year-old adventurer …

Matt Haig and I meet in a flat in London, the morning after the terrorist attack at the Manchester Arena. Typically, he has already spent several hours battling racists and trolls on Twitter (he has a very large following), but he doesn’t seem stressed. “I’m actually quite relaxed; I like this period just before I get really neurotic [about the launch of a new book],” he laughs. As for social media: “I tweet more when I’m writing more ... I’ve got quite a distracted brain anyway.”

Haig is probably best known for his 2015 book Reasons to Stay Alive (it was in the top 10 bestseller lists for nearly a year) – a warm and moving memoir-cum-self-help book about his first descent into depression, aged 24, and his subsequent efforts to climb out of it. Haig is also the author of seven novels for adults, seven books for children and various business books, but his latest is a genre-defying novel called How to Stop Time. Its hero is Tom Hazard, an unremarkable history teacher at a London comprehensive, who lives with a secret: he has a rare condition that makes him age very slowly; he may not...

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Data prompts debate about whether rise shows drugs are handed out too freely or whether more people are getting help

The NHS prescribed a record number of antidepressants last year, fuelling an upward trend that has seen the number of pills given to patients more than double over the last decade.

The figures raised questions over whether the rise shows doctors are handing out the drugs out too freely or whether it means more people are getting help to tackle their anxiety, depression and panic attacks.

Related: How long should you stay on antidepressants?

Related: Young people and antidepressants: share your experiences

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Public spending watchdog says it is unclear how inmates’ mental health can be improved with current levels of funding and insufficient data

Prisons have “struggled to cope” with record rates of suicide and self-harm among inmates following cuts to funding and staff numbers, the public spending watchdog has said. The National Audit Office said it remains unclear how the authorities will meet aims for improving prisoners’ mental health or get value for money because of a lack of relevant data.

Auditors said that self-harm incidents increased by 73% between 2012 and 2016 to 40,161, while the 120 self-inflicted deaths in prison in 2016 was the highest figure on record and almost double that for 2012. Since 2010, when David Cameron became prime minister, funding of offender management has been reduced by 13%, while staff numbers have been cut by 30%, the report said.

Related: Prisons taking role of care homes and hospices as older population soars

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An edited extract from Julia Gillard’s John Curtin prime ministerial library’s anniversary lecture

The more we return to John Curtin’s life, the greater his contribution appears, not just as a wartime leader and social reformer, but now – at last publicly and in a very modern way – as a disruptor, a mental health militant, if you will, even if he was unwilling to share that aspect of his personal story while he lived.

Curtin’s mental health journey resonates today with the work of beyondblue, particularly when it comes to men’s mental health.

Related: Sarah Wilson on living with anxiety: there’s no sugarcoating mental illness

Deify and deny: great men cannot be ill, certainly not mentally ill.

But what if they are not only ill; what if they are great, not in spite of manic-depression, but because of it?”

Related: Suicide rate among defence veterans far higher than for those currently serving

Related: Veterans' mental health services to get $350m budget boost

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An NHS-run therapeutic gardening project in London is helping to alleviate symptoms of severe mental health problems

It was around a year after Fatu Mangeh* arrived in the UK that she considered taking her own life.

In 2002 she fled the civil war in Sierra Leone where she had been raped and tortured – scars are still visible on her hands 15 years later. Her parents were killed and the only family she had left was her two-year-old daughter. She was lured to the UK by a man who promised to marry her but abandoned her, leaving her destitute and with no support. Wandering the streets, she came across a woman from Sierra Leone who offered to help; she took her to the Home Office to claim asylum and registered her with a GP.

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Report by Theos warns that “astonishing” increase in exorcisms is doing harm to people with mental health problems

Exorcisms are a booming industry in the UK, partly driven by immigrant communities and Pentecostal churches, according to a report from a Christian thinktank.

However, the vast majority of people being exorcised have mental health problems that require psychiatric assistance, says the report, published on Wednesday by Theos.

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A recent Medical Economics article asked “Is the DPC model at risk of failing?” The piece focuses on two large DPC-like organizations, Qliance Medical Management of Seattle, Washington and Turntable Health of Las Vegas, NV, working in partnership with Iora Health, which recently closed their doors. Qliance and Turntable were not actually DPC practices by […]

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Whether you believe in science, God, neither or some combination of the two — we can all agree that death is inevitable. Due to the finality of our lives, each of us should understand and prepare for that moment not only for ourselves but also for our loved ones. As medicine continues to advance and […]

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On the surface, the news from America about health care seems rather grim: cost and dissatisfaction keep rising, reforms are stalling, and, for some, even life expectancy may be declining.  If that wasn’t bad enough, President Trump issued a tweet on March 25 predicting that “Obamacare will explode.” For a small but growing number of […]

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Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 56-year-old woman presents to the office to discuss management of her type 2 diabetes mellitus. She is unhappy with her recent HbA1c value. She adheres to the maximum dose metformin monotherapy, which she has been taking for 1 year. Additionally, […]

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I receive a significant amount of email in response to my blog posts about locum tenens work. Curious colleagues (from surgeons to internists and emergency medicine physicians) ask for insider insight into this “mysterious business” of being a part-time or traveling physician. I am always happy to respond individually, but suddenly realized that I should […]

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Of course sitting GCSEs can be a trying experience, but with good support, study pressure can be positive

Across the country at the moment, young people are engaging in a practice that will give them nightmares for decades. Nope, not fidget spinners or Snapchat filters: those give only adults nightmares. The real answer is exams.

It’s almost 20 years since my maths GCSE and yet the bad dreams are still the same. No revision done, the exam hall lost in a labyrinth of corridors, the start already missed. I am not alone. Exam anxiety dreams are among the most common in adults. Is it these painful associations, then, that mean a quarter of British parents report their mental health was negatively affected by having children who are currently taking exams? Or is it, as the parents will more often tell you, because watching your child break under the pressure is enough to make anyone sick?

Related: GCSEs and A-levels: how are young people coping with exam stress?

Among boys, the number experiencing any psychological distress has actually gone down

Related: Six tactics to help your students deal with stress

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First long-term Australian study to investigate impacts of intimate partner violence finds those who have survived abuse ‘recorded significantly poorer health’

Women who are abused by their partner suffer significant physical and mental health problems that persist throughout their lifetime, the first long-term Australian study to investigate the health impacts of intimate partner violence has found.

The research, led by the University of Newcastle’s research centre for generational health and ageing, followed 16,761 participants from the Women’s Health Australia study for 16 years from 1996.

Related: Domestic violence: five women tell their stories of leaving - the most dangerous time

Related: When I first wrote about domestic violence, no one talked about it. Now the shame has lifted

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About this site

Mental health is a level of psychological well-being, or an absence of a mental disorder; it is the "psychological state of someone who is functioning at a satisfactory level of emotional and behavioral adjustment".

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