Blog

The landscape of health care has changed nearly beyond recognition in the past decade. If you’re a veteran of the profession, you’ve seen the other side of things — you once had the chance to live the dream, to swim in the pool of autonomy and self-employment, to call the shots and act on behalf […]

Read more ...

American medicine is in trouble, and the men and women who run our country’s medical societies are just the ones to save it. Think about the trouble, the confusion, the upheaval. Some call it reform. Some call it progress. Some call it just more damn, unnecessary change. Health care is such a politically volatile phrase […]

Read more ...

I’m probably in the minority on this, but I’m not a fan of the NYU School of Medicine free tuition program. Now I’m all for debt relief for medical students who start their careers with a mortgage. I was one of them. After 13 years, I’m still one of them! I’m also for any initiative […]

Read more ...

A guest column by the American Society of Anesthesiologists, exclusive to KevinMD.com. The path to becoming a physician is remarkably devoid of leadership training. Being an adept manager is an increasingly important aspect of medicine and is not explicitly taught as part of medical training. When we, as attending physicians, suddenly find ourselves in situations where we […]

Read more ...

Let’s face it, “wellness” isn’t going to go away despite some of the backlash. In my opinion, wellness is at the intersection of science, medicine, and health. Simply, wellness means health and happiness. No matter where you are on your health journey, you can achieve your wellness goals which can help you live a healthier life. […]

Read more ...

I have been working in pediatric primary care for nearly 5 years post-residency and truly love my work. I currently am dealing with very painful post-herpetic neuralgia and many people with this quit working. At some personal cost, I have continued my practice because I find my work day so rewarding I simply can’t imagine […]

Read more ...

Did a gym visit even happen if you didn’t post a selfie of it? Scroll Free September is urging online addicts to take a break

Name: Scroll Free September.

Age: Just a few days old.

Relax. It’s not the end of the world – just a month without Facebook

Related: Social media is harming the mental health of teenagers. The state has to act | June Eric Udorie

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Further research is needed on the link between children’s mental health and pollution, says Robin Russell-Jones, expanding electric vehicle infrastructure will help London, says Andy Boland, and incinerators should also be targeted in the capital, says Michael Ryan

The link between cognitive performance and air pollution is very worrying but not surprising (High pollution levels ‘causing huge reduction in intelligence’, 28 August). The report by the Royal College of Physicians in 2016 drew a link between air pollution and dementia in the elderly and reduced cognitive performance in children. This recent study from China indicates that teenagers and adults are also affected.

We don’t know how these effects are mediated, but with neurotoxins such as lead the most critical period of exposure is likely to be during pregnancy. A study undertaken in New York of non-smoking mothers showed strong associations with foetal exposure to particulates and subsequent mental health problems in those children at primary school age. These problems included anxiety, depression and ADHD. This has momentous implications for public health. We are suffering an epidemic of mental health problems among...

Read more ...

As Children’s Society report says 100,000 14-year-olds self-harm, one young woman tells her story

I was 12 when I first started self-harming. At my school there was a lot of bullying and harassment happening. Kids would throw my stuff out the window, pick on me for how I looked and the music I listened to. There was a lot of sexting going on within our school and I got targeted, which was very upsetting.

Related: Calls for action over UK's 'intolerable' child mental health crisis

Related: A safe space: NHS unit on frontline of child mental health crisis

Related: Quarter of 14-year-old girls in UK have self-harmed, report finds

Related: Mental health at university: know where to find support

Names have been changed.

In the UK, Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. In Australia, the crisis support service Lifeline is 13 11 14. Other international suicide helplines can be found at www.befrienders.org.

In the UK, Childline can be contacted on 0800 1111.

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Teachers and campaigners say young people under pressure but support is underfunded

  • Case study: ‘I self-harmed to cope with my feelings’

Children and teenagers are facing an “intolerable” mental health crisis and an urgent cash injection is needed in schools to prevent a lifetime of damage, teachers, doctors and MPs have warned.

Amid concerns about deeply worrying rates of self-harm and soaring numbers of children seeking help for problems such as eating disorders, teachers, campaigners and politicians have made a desperate plea to the government.

Related: At 14, I self-harmed to erase my body. But my body was not the enemy | Maggy van Eijk

Related: Children forced to travel hundreds of miles for NHS mental health treatment

Related: Hospital admissions for teenage girls who self-harm nearly double

Related: The Guardian view on self-harm: we live in uniquely pressurised times, and girls are suffering | Editorial

Children and young people in the UK who have concerns about mental health can contact Childline on 0800 1111. In the UK, Samaritans can be contacted on 116 123 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. In the US, the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-8255. In...

Read more ...

Scientists call for more investment in promoting healthy lifestyle after discovering strong link between diseases

Having a stroke can double the risk of developing dementia, say scientists, who are calling for more effort to be invested in promoting the healthy lifestyles that reduce the chances of stroke.

A team from Exeter University has analysed data on stroke and dementia risk from 48 separate studies involving a total of 3.2 million people around the world.

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Jessica Southgate on the mental health crisis among young women and girls, Mike Stein on the plight of young people generally, and Michael Heaton on the use of photographs that aggravate the problems of self-image among girls

It is extremely concerning, but unfortunately not surprising, that so many girls are self-harming (Report, 29 August). This adds to a growing body of evidence of a mental health crisis among young women and girls, with depression as well as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at alarming rates. Body image, pressures at school and gender stereotypes are rightly cited as possible explanations, but they are not the full story.

The sexualisation of girls, the pressures they face around sex, and particularly the alarming levels of sexual and other forms of violence they experience, must be a key part of the conversation. If we continue to bury our heads in the sand on this issue, self-harm figures will continue to rise.

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Kathryn Frazier spent much of her career raising the profiles of clients like Migos and Daft Punk through publicity but now as a life coach she also helps artists stay on an even keel

In the last 15 months, the suicides of Chris Cornell, Chester Bennington and Avicii have reinforced the notion that talent, success, wealth and worldwide fame do not assure happiness. In the wake of these deaths, mental health in the music industry has become a white-hot issue, with a genre-spanning collection of artists coming forth to discuss their own struggles with depression, anxiety, addiction and the pressures of fame.

And while her job has long been to help artists achieve such fame, Kathryn Frazier has more recently become a resource for them to figure out how to deal with it.

Related: Perfectionism and poverty: why musicians struggle with mental health

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Watchdog calculates cost to business and public purse of indebted and stressed adults – not helped by harsh bailiffs

The British economy is losing almost £900m a year from the rapid rise in personal debt problems, according to a report from the Whitehall spending watchdog.

The National Audit Office (NAO) said reduced levels of worker efficiency, people staying away from work and greater chances of people in debt committing crime, meant there was a wider cost of £897m annually to the overall economy.

Related: MPs rebuke councils for 'overzealous' use of bailiffs

Continue reading...

Read more ...

NHS England chief attacks foreign betting firms that fail to pay into £10m help fund

Betting firms who sponsor Premier League football clubs have been criticised by the chief executive of NHS England for apparently ignoring the industry's duty to help Britain's estimated 430,000 problem gamblers.

Simon Stevens castigated foreign-owned betting companies for not contributing to a £10m fund which pays for addicts' treatment while leaving the already overburdened health service to “pick up the pieces” from gambling-related mental ill health.

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Guidance from Universities UK and charity Papyrus seeks to halt rise in student deaths

All university staff who deal with students should receive training in suicide intervention and prevention, according to new guidelines.

But the guidance – published by the Universities UK (UUK) group and the youth suicide prevention charity Papyrus – makes only brief references to data protection issues that could block universities from contacting the families of vulnerable students.

Related: Bristol University did not help suicidal student before she died, coroner hears

Related: Student mental health must be top priority – universities minister

Continue reading...

Read more ...

One in three new fathers worry about their mental health. Many struggle to bond with their babies, or wrestle with despair and aggression. Why isn’t this more widely acknowledged – and why won’t the medical establishment support them?

Ross Hunt, his wife and their new baby were still on the maternity ward when he knew that something was wrong. “I realised I didn’t really want to hold her,” he says. The nurses handled her so casually, so instinctively; their ease made him recoil. “They lifted her up, blanket around her. I thought: ‘She’s tiny. I don’t want to touch her.’ But they made me.”

Back home, Hunt’s estrangement began to bed down. There was “just no connection” between him and the baby. His wife would dress little Isabelle, “looking all cute. She’d show me – and there was just nothing there. I’d wanted a baby so much; I assumed that when I had one, I would be fine. But any time Isabelle came to me and started crying, I almost took it personally.” He told his wife: “I know I don’t like her – but it’s mutual.”

Continue...

Read more ...

Mental health workers are taking their services to the doorstep in areas attacked by insurgents in north-east Nigeria

Cletus Nicholas takes his life in his hands when he gets on his keke marwa motor tricycle each morning.

For the past five weeks, he has been offering “counselling on wheels” support to survivors of Boko Haram attacks, going into villages around the city of Maiduguri in north-east Nigeria, the birthplace of the Islamist group.

Related: What next for the millions uprooted by Boko Haram? – photo essay

Related: Women saved from Boko Haram claim soldiers made them trade sex for food

Continue reading...

Read more ...

One in 14 people over the age of 65 in the UK will develop dementia and while there is no cure, scientific evidence shows there are several ways you can guard against it

Among the biggest risk factors for dementia are diabetes and mid-life obesity, which can double your chances of dementia at a later age. Links have also been found between elevated blood pressure, high cholesterol levels and the risk of dementia, although these are not conclusive. Monitoring your weight and cardiovascular health in middle age could greatly reduce your likelihood of dementia.

Related: Are dementia-friendly communities the answer to isolation and stigma? | Claire Goodman

Continue reading...

Read more ...

The academic rigour of an affecting study of suicide is undermined by a simplistic conclusion

“I think – and I know it sounds melodramatic – that I might not make it this year,” 17-year-old New Zealand schoolgirl Victoria McLeod wrote in her journal at the start of 2014. “I know when I see those grades bold and black on a piece of paper, I will either jump for joy or jump off the top floor of this condo.”

Her grades came back first class but, on 14 April that year, she still jumped to her death from the 10-storey apartment block. Her devastated parents, Linda and Malcolm, have shared her diary with developmental psychologist and science writer Jesse Bering, in the hope they might help others make sense of the epidemic of apparently talented, healthy and blessed young people, with fulfilling lives beckoning, killing themselves.

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Australia’s offshore processing regime under spotlight with at least 20 troubled refugee children on ‘food and fluid refusal’

• Pacific Islands Forum: what is it and why have some media been banned?

Nauru’s hosting of the Pacific Islands Forum is at risk of being overshadowed by its role in Australia’s offshore processing regime – in particular, the acute mental illness of dozens of refugee children.

Medical sources on Nauru say at least 20 children are in the Australian-run regional processing centre 1 (RPC1) on “food and fluid refusal” and at risk of permanent harm or death.

Related: Pacific Islands Forum: what is it and why have some media been banned?

Related: 12-year-old on Nauru who tried to set herself alight not getting medical treatment, father says

Related: ‘Darkness surrounds me’: Nauru child refugee paints pictures of despair

Continue reading...

Read more ...

The past decade has seen an enormous upheaval in the practice of medicine. The private independent medical practice is in danger of extinction. Management overhead and red tape has skyrocketed due to government regulations and private insurance and pharmaceutical benefit rules. Added to that are multiple electronic medical records that need to be implemented, vary […]

Read more ...

The trouble began when I needed to open the electronic health record (EHR) system for the tenth time that day. EHRs have significantly changed the way we practice medicine. They have completely eliminated the need for storage and transport of paper charts, reduced prescription errors secondary to illegible handwritings of physicians and provided an excellent […]

Read more ...

Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 77-year-old woman is evaluated for frequently fluctuating INRs (<1.8 to >3.5) while taking warfarin therapy. She has undergone INR testing every 1 to 2 weeks and frequent warfarin dose adjustments. She reports a consistent dietary intake. Medical history is notable […]

Read more ...

In the second week of April, I headed to San Francisco where I took part in the SWOG Semi-Annual Meeting. To those who might be unfamiliar with us, SWOG is a member organization of the National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) and is tasked in running clinical trials across disease sites and scenarios, from prevention to […]

Read more ...

American physicians dole out lots of unnecessary medical care to their patients. They prescribe things like antibiotics for people with viral infections, order expensive CT scans for patients with transitory back pain, and obtain screening EKGs for people with no signs or symptoms of heart disease. Some critics even accuse physicians of ordering such services […]

Read more ...

With the transition to residency, I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about next steps in my career. I even did a self-reflection exercise for a class in which I listed out professional decisions that will come up in the next few years (including choices like fellowship selection, type of practice setting, whether to pursue […]

Read more ...

What is it? Kratom is a powdered herbal supplement derived from the leaves of a tropical evergreen tree that is native to Southeast Asia and is usually taken orally but can also be brewed into teas. It is commonly used by consumers as an alternative medicine to self-treat opioid addiction and chronic pain.  The leaves […]

Read more ...

MP decries ‘nonsensical’ situation as parents make six-hour trips to visit daughter

People with life-threatening eating disorders in an area of England with poor provision are being sent miles away from home for help despite a new specialist centre in the area lying empty.

Chris McKenna, a clinical psychologist, has spent £2m transforming his family home in Suffolk into a 12-bed inpatient facility called the Chimneys. He did so after finding out there was no treatment centre in the county when his daughter needed treatment for anorexia, and she would have to go to Norwich for help.

Related: 'People shouldn't have to move': getting care for an eating disorder

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Psychologists helping judges opt for community sentences as alternative to prison

Offenders with mental health, alcohol and drug abuse problems are being referred to health services as part of community sentences in an effort to steer them away from jail time.

Under a pilot scheme in five areas in England, psychologists and panels comprising justice and health officials have been providing information to judges or magistrates to determine whether offenders should be required to receive treatment.

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Calls for new fathers as well as mothers to be screened for depression after the birth of a child

The mental health of new fathers is being overlooked despite evidence suggesting men might experience similar rates of depression to mothers after the birth of a child, experts have warned.

It is thought at least 10% of new mothers experience postnatal depression, although charities have said figures could be higher as surveys have shown many women do not seek help or are not asked about their mental health after having a baby.

Related: Can men get postnatal depression?

Related: Postnatal depression – ‘I felt disembodied for so long but suddenly I was back in my own body’

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Coalition of NGOs and charities calls for children to be brought to Australia by 20 November

A coalition of some of Australia’s biggest humanitarian and human rights organisations have given the federal government a deadline to get all asylum seeker and refugee children off Nauru, as the health and safety crisis on the island worsens.

World Vision, alongside more than 30 other organisations and advocacy groups, has called for parliament to bring the more than 120 children and their families to Australia or settled in a safe third country by Universal Children’s Day on 20 November.

Related: Each time Australia delays bringing a sick child from Nauru, the stakes get higher | Ben Doherty

Related: Resignation syndrome: a true story | First Dog on the Moon

Related: Dutton’s Ashmore Reef bill passed as Coalition and Labor accused of asylum seeker ‘cruelty’

Continue reading...

Read more ...

In her first nonfiction book, Mary K Pershall examines the complex mental and institutional issues that led to the ‘unimaginable horror’ of her child taking another’s life

Mary Pershall dared to hope. Her daughter, Anna, had agreed to go to rehab, to tackle her dependence on alcohol, synthetic cannabis and ice. In return, Mary had put aside her scruples and driven to an adult store so that Anna could buy synthetic cannabis. It’s not an uncommon bargaining chip used by despairing parents. It would keep Anna’s withdrawals at bay until she was safely under medical supervision, but also – hopefully – secure her cooperation.

Not long after, Mary was chopping vegetables in their comfortable home in Oak Park, a northern suburb of Melbourne, when she spotted Anna walking briskly off down the driveway. She dropped the knife and ran after her.

Related: ‘Mine is not a hedonistic tale’: Jenny Valentish on trauma, addiction and the women left behind

She was this beautiful young white woman, so people didn’t take her seriously when she was being violent

Continue reading...

Read more ...

My wife, Gilla Gelberg, a psychotherapist working for the NHS in Newham, east London, has died aged 63, after being knocked down by a bus outside her workplace in Stratford. She was the psychodynamic psychotherapy team leader, working with individuals from diverse backgrounds with complex issues in which social deprivation, family abuse and refugee status converged. Despite the stress and challenges, this was her dream job, the culmination of years of training and clinical experience.

Born in Bloemfontein, in apartheid South Africa, daughter of Misha Gelberg, who owned and ran a men’s clothing store, and Shula Machnes, a former dancer, Gilla moved to London in 1978. A professional jazz vocalist in the early 1980s, she had a much stronger drive to help people, especially children, with emotional difficulty and trauma.

Continue reading...

Read more ...

‘Talk about how you’re feeling,’ singer urges, as experts say taboos can leave people isolated

Perinatal health experts and campaigners have praised the singer Adele for highlighting the issue of postpartum psychosis in new mothers.

Her best friend, Laura Dockrill – a poet, author, illustrator and short story writer – was diagnosed with postpartum psychosis after giving birth to a boy, who is Adele’s godson.

Related: Postnatal depression: fathers can suffer similar issues to women, say experts

Related: Postnatal depression – ‘I felt disembodied for so long but suddenly I was back in my own body’

Related: Postnatal depression is not a new phenomenon, only a chronically ignored one

Continue reading...

Read more ...

We’d like to hear your experiences of moving between CAMHS and adult services

In July it was reported that there has been a sharp rise in the number of under-19s being treated by NHS mental health services in England.

Related: Together we can stop children’s mental health services being cut | Louise Irvine and Tony O’Sullivan

Continue reading...

Read more ...

The Pitstop is just the latest nostalgic project created by staff to give residents spaces to reminisce and spend time with friends and family

For the first half of my career, working in a range of jobs across retail and manufacturing, I could not have imagined that my life’s work would turn out to be in dementia care. Everything changed when my husband became terminally ill in 2005, and I left my job to become his full-time carer.

Related: Care Home Open Day is a chance to showcase the best of care work

Our next addition will be a purpose-built pub, in memory of a much-loved resident

Related: Sign up for the Society Weekly email newsletter

Continue reading...

Read more ...

The transition to university is drastic – and not everyone sails through it. That’s why university mental health setups are second to none

At the beginning of his second year at Loughborough University, Rahul Mathasing started struggling. His moods were becoming darker, his motivation disappeared and he started missing lectures. He approached the university medical centre, which referred him to the local NHS community mental health team. His pattern of behaviour – manic episodes in which he couldn’t concentrate or sleep, as well as episodes of very low moods – led to a diagnosis, in February 2015, of bipolar disorder.

Related: Young people’s mental health: we can build a resilient generation​ | Paul Burstow

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Care Quality Commission figures show overall number falling but more women have begun taking their own lives than men

More than 200 patients killed themselves in mental health units over seven years, new figures have revealed, prompting concern about the safety and quality of care.

Data collected by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) shows that 224 people died of self-inflicted injuries between 2010 and 2016 in mental health hospitals in England.

Related: Judge calls for Mental Health Act reform over rising detentions

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Linda Fairbrother and Colin Brewer respond to Henk Blanken’s long read on the limits of legal euthanasia

Henk Blanken (The difficulty of dying well, 10 August) suggests that the responsibility for authorising euthanasia should lie with a “loved one”. I doubt this would work any better than leaving it to a doctor. My elderly mother coped with my father’s progressing dementia for six years, though the task was becoming impossible, because she could not bear to place him in a dementia unit. She finally agreed to do so only after the local hospital told her she must not take him back home after a minor stroke. This took away the burden of guilt at “abandoning” him. If it was hard for my mother to put her husband in a care home, how much harder, even impossible, would it be for anyone in similar circumstances to decide their loved one should die on their say-so, however rational that decision might be?
Linda Fairbrother
Cambridge

• Alzheimer’s is now the single most common cause of death in Britain. If severely affected, most Britons would not want treatment for life-threatening illnesses. A 2007 survey found that more than 60% would not wish to be resuscitated after a heart attack....

Read more ...

We’re good at talking about death and mental health, but sex is a conversational hurdle we have yet to overcome

• Guardian Jobs: see the latest vacancies in healthcare

As a junior doctor working in psychiatry, I’m always struck by the honest answers and insight my patients share with me, offering a glimpse into how their mental health affects every aspect of their lives – from their finances and their diets to their sleeping patterns, careers and even dog-walking routines.

Related: Sex and special needs: Why new schools guidance must embrace pupils with learning difficulties

Families of patients managing mental health symptoms frequently voice their concerns about managing their sexual needs

Related: The day I removed a toy dinosaur from a woman's vagina

Related: Sign up for the Society Weekly email newsletter

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Recent research from Florida Atlantic University and Cleveland State University have found a direct correlation between preventative health care and the number of paid sick leave days a worker gets. Workers with more than 10 paid sick days annually access preventative care more frequently than those without paid sick days. Preventative care, in turn, leads to […]

Read more ...

I come by many things in my life naturally — my stubbornness, my red hair, and my career. I am very fortunate. Unlike many I am the daughter of a female emergency physician. This is something I never really considered while growing up. Yes, my mom was a doctor. Did she save lives? I guess […]

Read more ...

Physicians on the front lines of health care today are sometimes described as going to battle. It’s an apt metaphor. Physicians, like combat soldiers, often face a profound and unrecognized threat to their well-being: moral injury. Moral injury is frequently mischaracterized. In combat veterans it is diagnosed as post-traumatic stress; among physicians it’s portrayed as […]

Read more ...

Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 38-year-old woman is evaluated in follow-up after recent surgery for endometrial cancer. Her family history is significant for colon cancer in her sister (diagnosed at age 45 years) and her mother (diagnosed at age 65 years). Her maternal grandfather was […]

Read more ...

Permit to park freely extended to those with ‘hidden conditions’, including autism

The “blue badge” scheme, which allows people with disabilities to park close to their destinations – including on yellow lines – is to be extended to those with hidden conditions, such as mental health difficulties, in the biggest change to the system in 40 years.

The new rules, which could benefit millions of people, will come into effect early next year, in what ministers say is part of a move to give equal treatment to those with physical and mental health issues.

Related: My daughter is not deemed 'disabled enough' to get free parking | Nicky Clark

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Shortage of beds is one thing, but it’s the reduction in qualified staff and the lack of money that are really crippling the service

The reduction in beds for mental health makes a good headline (“Number of NHS beds for mental health patients slumps by 30%”, News), but it is not the main concern. The article highlights the reduction in qualified mental health professionals: mental health nurses down from 46,155 to 39,358 and a reduction in the number of trainee psychiatrists. This is the real crisis.

It is estimated that mental health is 22.8% of the burden of illness in the NHS but receives only 10.8% of funding. The reduction in qualified professionals means parity of esteem for mental health is a pipe dream as there are not enough qualified people to employ if funding increased. Mental health policy needs to be dynamic and imaginative in addressing this paradox. There needs to be a stratospheric increase in funding. Initially, this should address training of mental health professionals. Funding should be aimed at increasing community provision, not bed-based inpatient solutions. Let’s ensure that inpatient admissions are only necessary after high-quality community alternatives...

Read more ...

As many of those who have struggled with mental health know, the road to recovery is hard

Drug addiction and mental illness are real, constant struggles for millions of Americans, and Demi Lovato has long been forthcoming about the fact that she is among them.

Her honesty has been a gift to many people who have experienced similar illnesses. And while much of the media will claw to eke out whatever grim details they can of what happened on Tuesday when she was rushed to the hospital after an apparent overdose, we should instead take this as an opportunity to recognize how Lovato’s openness about her struggles with addiction and mental health have shone a light on these issues in ways that celebrities rarely do.

Related: 'I wasn't ready to get sober': how Demi Lovato faces her demons squarely

If you’ve told everyone you’re cured, it can feel like a humiliating failure to admit that you need more help

Related: Drugs alone won't fix our epidemic of depression | James S Gordon

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Years after your death, I still think of the young woman who needed help from the psychiatric department where I worked

Never again will I see you drunk and distressed in the emergency department. And that is sad, because while you were suffering you were alive, and while you were alive there was hope. I don’t want to walk up the corridor to another drunk girl who’s self-harmed and it not be you. But I know I will never see you again.

I first met you when you were in your late teens. I was employed in an eating disorder unit, an undergraduate psychology student charged with distracting 12 young people from the distress of their full bellies after meals. You had arrived with anorexia and were in the advanced stages of starvation, having survived a cardiac arrest. No one was sure if you would live, but you were determined. You recovered to the point of enrolling at university, from where you wrote to me saying you were excited about your course. That was the last I heard for years.

Related: Every doctor has one death they remember. For me, it was you

Related: Sign up for the Society Weekly email newsletter

Continue reading...

Read more ...

Take back control, urges public health body, as it encourages people to abstain or cut down

We’ve got Dry January for anyone tempted to try alcohol abstinence and Stoptober for smokers who want to quit. Now, Scroll Free September will target the use of social media.

The Royal Society for Public Health, which is behind the campaign, is urging everyone to stop using – or reduce use of – Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, Instagram and other social media platforms for the month.

Related: Social media firms failing to protect young people, survey finds

Related: Social media and celebrity culture 'harming young people'

Continue reading...

Read more ...

About this site

Mental health is a level of psychological well-being, or an absence of a mental disorder; it is the "psychological state of someone who is functioning at a satisfactory level of emotional and behavioral adjustment".

Feed Display

#1 Mental Health Blog – Talkspace